Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186588
Title:
Stress and fracture analysis for systems with inhomogeneities.
Author:
Hu, Kai Xiong.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The inhomogeneities situated in materials render the diversification of composite families, and can provide synergistic effects for tailoring materials to a specified and often hostile environment. The work presented here focuses on the fracture and stress analysis of systems with various inhomogeneities. In Chapter 1, interactions among cracks and rigid-line inclusions are investigated. Rigid-line inclusions are represented by a distribution of forces while cracks are modeled by the standard dislocation approach. Chapter 2 presents an analysis of composite systems with interacting cracks and a dilute distribution of inclusions. A damage analysis procedure is developed to evaluate the effective properties of such composites. Chapter 3 examines multiple void-crack interactions. The formulation is based on a mixture of dislocations and tractions. Chapter 4 presents an approach to modeling bridged crack systems. A fully regular integral equation formulation is developed and the approach is ideally suited for the analysis of systems with large number of closely spaced inhomogeneities. The integral equations of different forms, developed throughout the dissertation can also be utilized to evaluate and verify various micromechanical models. The possible future extensions and the major limitations of the present work are briefly discussed in Chapter 5.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Mechanical engineering.; Mechanics, Applied.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Chandra, Abhijit

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStress and fracture analysis for systems with inhomogeneities.en_US
dc.creatorHu, Kai Xiong.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Kai Xiong.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe inhomogeneities situated in materials render the diversification of composite families, and can provide synergistic effects for tailoring materials to a specified and often hostile environment. The work presented here focuses on the fracture and stress analysis of systems with various inhomogeneities. In Chapter 1, interactions among cracks and rigid-line inclusions are investigated. Rigid-line inclusions are represented by a distribution of forces while cracks are modeled by the standard dislocation approach. Chapter 2 presents an analysis of composite systems with interacting cracks and a dilute distribution of inclusions. A damage analysis procedure is developed to evaluate the effective properties of such composites. Chapter 3 examines multiple void-crack interactions. The formulation is based on a mixture of dislocations and tractions. Chapter 4 presents an approach to modeling bridged crack systems. A fully regular integral equation formulation is developed and the approach is ideally suited for the analysis of systems with large number of closely spaced inhomogeneities. The integral equations of different forms, developed throughout the dissertation can also be utilized to evaluate and verify various micromechanical models. The possible future extensions and the major limitations of the present work are briefly discussed in Chapter 5.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectMechanical engineering.en_US
dc.subjectMechanics, Applied.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairChandra, Abhijiten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHuang, Youngen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadenci, Erdoganen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9422815en_US
dc.identifier.oclc722384444en_US
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