Isolation and characterization of ultraviolet light hypersensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186569
Title:
Isolation and characterization of ultraviolet light hypersensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Author:
Harlow, Greg Russell.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
UV resistance mechanisms have been extensively studied in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells, but little is known about these mechanisms in plant cells. We have developed a genetic screen to help identify mutant Arabidopsis plants that are hypersensitive to the damaging effects of UV light. Six mutants, designated uvh1 through uvh6, were isolated by this screening procedure. The uvh mutants, which behave as single recessive traits, form six complementation groups. Although isolated as hypersensitive to UV-C light wavelengths, all of the uvh mutants are also hypersensitive to small fluences of UV-B wavelengths that do not affect wild type plants. UV-induced damage in the uvh mutants could be reduced or eliminated by subsequent exposure to light containing photoreactivating wavelengths, suggesting that the damage is pyrimidine dimers. One of the mutants, uvh1, was shown not to be defective in protection of chloroplast and nuclear DNA from UV-induced damage, suggesting that the defect in uvh1 may be in repair or toleration of UV-induced damage. Further analysis revealed that levels of UV-induced DNA damage removal were the same in chloroplast and nuclear DNA of uvh1 and wild type plants. uvh1 was more sensitive than wild type to the rosette-inhibiting effects of ionizing radiation, suggesting a possible defect in recombinational repair in uvh1, however, the frequency of meiotic recombination was normal in uvh1. In a collaborative study with Dr. E. Signer, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, uvh1 was shown to be defective in T-DNA integration, suggesting a defect in non-homologous genetic recombination. As a first step in isolating the gene by map-based cloning, genetic and RFLP mapping techniques were used to localize the uvh1 mutation to a region of chromosome 3.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Molecular biology.; Plant physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Molecular and Cellular Biology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mount, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleIsolation and characterization of ultraviolet light hypersensitive mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana.en_US
dc.creatorHarlow, Greg Russell.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarlow, Greg Russell.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractUV resistance mechanisms have been extensively studied in bacteria, fungi, and mammalian cells, but little is known about these mechanisms in plant cells. We have developed a genetic screen to help identify mutant Arabidopsis plants that are hypersensitive to the damaging effects of UV light. Six mutants, designated uvh1 through uvh6, were isolated by this screening procedure. The uvh mutants, which behave as single recessive traits, form six complementation groups. Although isolated as hypersensitive to UV-C light wavelengths, all of the uvh mutants are also hypersensitive to small fluences of UV-B wavelengths that do not affect wild type plants. UV-induced damage in the uvh mutants could be reduced or eliminated by subsequent exposure to light containing photoreactivating wavelengths, suggesting that the damage is pyrimidine dimers. One of the mutants, uvh1, was shown not to be defective in protection of chloroplast and nuclear DNA from UV-induced damage, suggesting that the defect in uvh1 may be in repair or toleration of UV-induced damage. Further analysis revealed that levels of UV-induced DNA damage removal were the same in chloroplast and nuclear DNA of uvh1 and wild type plants. uvh1 was more sensitive than wild type to the rosette-inhibiting effects of ionizing radiation, suggesting a possible defect in recombinational repair in uvh1, however, the frequency of meiotic recombination was normal in uvh1. In a collaborative study with Dr. E. Signer, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, uvh1 was shown to be defective in T-DNA integration, suggesting a defect in non-homologous genetic recombination. As a first step in isolating the gene by map-based cloning, genetic and RFLP mapping techniques were used to localize the uvh1 mutation to a region of chromosome 3.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectMolecular biology.en_US
dc.subjectPlant physiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMount, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOishi, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWard, Samuelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLittle, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiesfeld, Rogeren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421774en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721978291en_US
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