Self-reported embarrassment between Chinese, Chinese American, and Caucasian American college students.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186552
Title:
Self-reported embarrassment between Chinese, Chinese American, and Caucasian American college students.
Author:
Lee, Sammy.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One purpose of this study was to determine if there were any differences in embarrassment between Chinese, Chinese American, and Caucasian American college students. A related purpose was to determine if there were any behavioral characteristics associated with embarrassment among the three groups. A total of 137 college students were given the Embarrassment Questionnaire (Modigliani, 1966) and the revised California Psychological Inventory (CPI; Gough, 1987). Three hypotheses were tested. The first: that there was no significant difference on the embarrassment questionnaire mean score between the three groups. The second: that there was no commonality in the kinds of embarrassing situations experienced by the three groups. The third: that there was no significant difference between the three groups in behavioral characteristics as measured by the CPI. The first hypothesis was tested using ANOVA. The three groups' mean scores on the embarrassment questionnaire were significantly different at the.05 level. The Chinese Americans were the least embarrassable. The Chinese were in the middle and the Caucasian Americans were the most embarrassable. This result may be related to how open or guarded the subjects were in responding to the questionnaire. The second hypothesis was tested using factor analysis. Because of the small sub-samples and the resulting factors accounting for 11% of the variance, it was concluded that there was no commonality in the kinds of embarrassing situations experienced by the three groups. With the third hypothesis ANOVA was used to test the significance of the differences between the three groups on the twenty scales of the revised CPI. The results suggest that the variance among the three groups was due to factors other than ethnicity.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Social psychology.; Ethnology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Christensen, Harley D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSelf-reported embarrassment between Chinese, Chinese American, and Caucasian American college students.en_US
dc.creatorLee, Sammy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Sammy.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne purpose of this study was to determine if there were any differences in embarrassment between Chinese, Chinese American, and Caucasian American college students. A related purpose was to determine if there were any behavioral characteristics associated with embarrassment among the three groups. A total of 137 college students were given the Embarrassment Questionnaire (Modigliani, 1966) and the revised California Psychological Inventory (CPI; Gough, 1987). Three hypotheses were tested. The first: that there was no significant difference on the embarrassment questionnaire mean score between the three groups. The second: that there was no commonality in the kinds of embarrassing situations experienced by the three groups. The third: that there was no significant difference between the three groups in behavioral characteristics as measured by the CPI. The first hypothesis was tested using ANOVA. The three groups' mean scores on the embarrassment questionnaire were significantly different at the.05 level. The Chinese Americans were the least embarrassable. The Chinese were in the middle and the Caucasian Americans were the most embarrassable. This result may be related to how open or guarded the subjects were in responding to the questionnaire. The second hypothesis was tested using factor analysis. Because of the small sub-samples and the resulting factors accounting for 11% of the variance, it was concluded that there was no commonality in the kinds of embarrassing situations experienced by the three groups. With the third hypothesis ANOVA was used to test the significance of the differences between the three groups on the twenty scales of the revised CPI. The results suggest that the variance among the three groups was due to factors other than ethnicity.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectSocial psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEthnology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairChristensen, Harley D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Betty J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristensen, Oscar C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421759en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721998983en_US
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