Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186544
Title:
Assistive technology in Arizona: A survey of service providers.
Author:
Boyless, James Andrus.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research evidence indicates that assistive technology services and devices, mandated by law, are not being provided to individuals with disabilities in Arizona. This study described the professionals within Arizona providing AT services and devices, their training needs, and the current AT service delivery system. The study also proposed essential elements for an AT service delivery network to meet the technological needs of individuals with disabilities within the State of Arizona. A survey, developed with assistance from experts, was mailed to 1,014 service providers in six distinct service specialties. Professionals in the Arizona Department of Education, Division of Developmental Disabilities, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Speech Pathology were asked to furnish information pertaining to four research questions: (1) Who are the AT service providers? (2) What is the current AT service delivery system in Arizona? (3) What are the perceived AT training needs of service providers? (4) What do service providers perceive as essential components in a comprehensive AT service delivery network? The survey results indicated that AT services in Arizona were provided by predominantly Anglo, highly educated females living in the two largest metropolitan counties in Arizona. Less than half had received any training in AT. No AT service delivery system exists today in Arizona. Services were provided by chance rather than as a normal procedure in medical or human service organizations. Perceived training needs paralleled provider specialty with training through workshops at the local level. According to survey respondents essential components of an AT service delivery network should include information, training, funding, collaboration, consumer involvement, and delivery models. Implications of the study suggest that Arizona must implement the following changes: (1) establish a statewide AT service delivery network linking providers, consumers, and caregivers; (2) select a lead agency to coordinate all efforts in AT for the State; (3) appoint a strong advocate of AT as head of the agency; (4) develop a training program; (5) recruit minorities and persons from technical areas to provide services; (6) reduce the gap in the delivery of AT services to those under 60 years; and (7) increase the number of qualified AT providers for the growing population of the elderly, the adult, and children in all independent living, educational, and work environments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Special education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Umbreit, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAssistive technology in Arizona: A survey of service providers.en_US
dc.creatorBoyless, James Andrus.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoyless, James Andrus.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch evidence indicates that assistive technology services and devices, mandated by law, are not being provided to individuals with disabilities in Arizona. This study described the professionals within Arizona providing AT services and devices, their training needs, and the current AT service delivery system. The study also proposed essential elements for an AT service delivery network to meet the technological needs of individuals with disabilities within the State of Arizona. A survey, developed with assistance from experts, was mailed to 1,014 service providers in six distinct service specialties. Professionals in the Arizona Department of Education, Division of Developmental Disabilities, Rehabilitation Services Administration, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, and Speech Pathology were asked to furnish information pertaining to four research questions: (1) Who are the AT service providers? (2) What is the current AT service delivery system in Arizona? (3) What are the perceived AT training needs of service providers? (4) What do service providers perceive as essential components in a comprehensive AT service delivery network? The survey results indicated that AT services in Arizona were provided by predominantly Anglo, highly educated females living in the two largest metropolitan counties in Arizona. Less than half had received any training in AT. No AT service delivery system exists today in Arizona. Services were provided by chance rather than as a normal procedure in medical or human service organizations. Perceived training needs paralleled provider specialty with training through workshops at the local level. According to survey respondents essential components of an AT service delivery network should include information, training, funding, collaboration, consumer involvement, and delivery models. Implications of the study suggest that Arizona must implement the following changes: (1) establish a statewide AT service delivery network linking providers, consumers, and caregivers; (2) select a lead agency to coordinate all efforts in AT for the State; (3) appoint a strong advocate of AT as head of the agency; (4) develop a training program; (5) recruit minorities and persons from technical areas to provide services; (6) reduce the gap in the delivery of AT services to those under 60 years; and (7) increase the number of qualified AT providers for the growing population of the elderly, the adult, and children in all independent living, educational, and work environments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectSpecial education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairUmbreit, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChalfant, James C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPysh, Margareten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421751en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721355482en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.