Screening instruments for dissociative disorders: Their evaluation in a college population.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186530
Title:
Screening instruments for dissociative disorders: Their evaluation in a college population.
Author:
Angiulo, Michael James
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the interest of early identification and prevention of dissociative disorders, this author has contributed to the research history of various screening instruments and has commented on the degree to which such instruments are appropriate for screening subjects in a college population. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES; Bernstein & Putnam & Putnam, 1986) was administered to approximately 2500 college freshmen. Subjects from various levels of the distribution of DES scores were recalled to the laboratory for further testing on the abbreviated version of the Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders (Mini-SCID-D) (Steinberg, Rounsaville & Cicchetti, 1987) to determine how many of these subjects might actually qualify for a diagnosis of dissociative disorder. The results of this study supported the factor structure of the DES as reported by Ross, Joshi, and Currie (1991). In addition, the DES evidenced a significant predictive relationship with the Mini SCID-D. The research was designed to screen a population at large for dissociative tendencies, the results of which will be useful to people who wish to identify ostensibly normal individuals who may be at risk for dissociative disorders. This research was supported in part by Grant #MH35856 from the National Institute of Mental Health to John F. Kihlstrom.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Psychometrics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Aleamoni, Lawrence M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleScreening instruments for dissociative disorders: Their evaluation in a college population.en_US
dc.creatorAngiulo, Michael Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorAngiulo, Michael Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the interest of early identification and prevention of dissociative disorders, this author has contributed to the research history of various screening instruments and has commented on the degree to which such instruments are appropriate for screening subjects in a college population. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES; Bernstein & Putnam & Putnam, 1986) was administered to approximately 2500 college freshmen. Subjects from various levels of the distribution of DES scores were recalled to the laboratory for further testing on the abbreviated version of the Structured Clinical Interview for Dissociative Disorders (Mini-SCID-D) (Steinberg, Rounsaville & Cicchetti, 1987) to determine how many of these subjects might actually qualify for a diagnosis of dissociative disorder. The results of this study supported the factor structure of the DES as reported by Ross, Joshi, and Currie (1991). In addition, the DES evidenced a significant predictive relationship with the Mini SCID-D. The research was designed to screen a population at large for dissociative tendencies, the results of which will be useful to people who wish to identify ostensibly normal individuals who may be at risk for dissociative disorders. This research was supported in part by Grant #MH35856 from the National Institute of Mental Health to John F. Kihlstrom.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectPsychometrics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKihlstrom, John F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoll, Luis C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFletcher, Todden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421738en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721356452en_US
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