THEORIES OF REACTIVITY IN SELF-MONITORING: A COMPARISON OF OPERANT AND COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL MODELS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186504
Title:
THEORIES OF REACTIVITY IN SELF-MONITORING: A COMPARISON OF OPERANT AND COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL MODELS.
Author:
MACE, F. CHARLES.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Three theoretical models explaining reactivity in self-monitoring were examined including one cognitive-behavioral and two operant views. Each theoretical account was represented by the following self-monitoring conditions: (1) self-monitoring (Rachlin-operant recording response model), (2) self-monitoring and goal setting (Kanfer-cognitive-mediational model), (3) self-monitoring, goal setting and self-reinforcement (Nelson and Hayes-multiple cueing stimuli model), (4) goal setting and self-reinforcement (Kanfer-cognitive-mediational model), and (5) training only. The comparative effects of the five self-monitoring conditions on the dependent measure, verbal nonfluencies, were evaluated using a repeated measures analysis of covariance design with the pretest as covariate. Results of the study indicated that self-monitoring conditions containing a self-reinforcement component (i.e., conditions 3 and 4) produced the greatest reactivity. Moreover, the presence of reinforcement appeared to positively influence whether subjects reached their individually set goals for reducing nonfluencies. The vast majority of self-reported cognitions associated with the occurrence of the target behavior were independently judged to be neutral rather than self-reinforcing or self-punishing. The implications of this study for the role of external versus covert forms of reinforcement were discussed as well as the use of this technique in clinical practice.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Goal (Psychology); Motivation (Psychology)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kratochwill, Thomas

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHEORIES OF REACTIVITY IN SELF-MONITORING: A COMPARISON OF OPERANT AND COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL MODELS.en_US
dc.creatorMACE, F. CHARLES.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMACE, F. CHARLES.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThree theoretical models explaining reactivity in self-monitoring were examined including one cognitive-behavioral and two operant views. Each theoretical account was represented by the following self-monitoring conditions: (1) self-monitoring (Rachlin-operant recording response model), (2) self-monitoring and goal setting (Kanfer-cognitive-mediational model), (3) self-monitoring, goal setting and self-reinforcement (Nelson and Hayes-multiple cueing stimuli model), (4) goal setting and self-reinforcement (Kanfer-cognitive-mediational model), and (5) training only. The comparative effects of the five self-monitoring conditions on the dependent measure, verbal nonfluencies, were evaluated using a repeated measures analysis of covariance design with the pretest as covariate. Results of the study indicated that self-monitoring conditions containing a self-reinforcement component (i.e., conditions 3 and 4) produced the greatest reactivity. Moreover, the presence of reinforcement appeared to positively influence whether subjects reached their individually set goals for reducing nonfluencies. The vast majority of self-reported cognitions associated with the occurrence of the target behavior were independently judged to be neutral rather than self-reinforcing or self-punishing. The implications of this study for the role of external versus covert forms of reinforcement were discussed as well as the use of this technique in clinical practice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGoal (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectMotivation (Psychology)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKratochwill, Thomasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBergan, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNicholson, Glenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Anneen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8319726en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689052367en_US
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