The determinants of physician practice choice and its effect on physician autonomy, satisfaction, and commitment.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186498
Title:
The determinants of physician practice choice and its effect on physician autonomy, satisfaction, and commitment.
Author:
Huonker, John Walter.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effective management of professionals requires achieving a balance between organizational control and professional autonomy. The problem of achieving a balance is important currently in the United States healthcare industry. This dissertation examined the antecedents and consequences of physician autonomy in both traditional fee-for-service (FFS) and non-traditional managed care settings. The population of physicians in one county were surveyed. Two models were developed arguing that physician practice choice affects autonomy. The antecedents and consequences of autonomy were compared both between FFS and managed care practice and between different types of managed care organizations (MCOs). Results indicate that most physicians in the survey area choose managed care practice, and the value physicians place on income is positively associated with the volume of patients from MCOs. FFS practice generated greater autonomy than MCO practice, and autonomy within MCOs positively affected practice satisfaction. Group practice positively affected autonomy within MCOs. Autonomy did not vary across different MCO types but was influenced by the process variables physician decision involvement and organizational formalization, thus suggesting that classifying organizations by autonomy requires knowledge of the processes used in the MCO.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Health services administration.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Management and Policy; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Burns, Lawton R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe determinants of physician practice choice and its effect on physician autonomy, satisfaction, and commitment.en_US
dc.creatorHuonker, John Walter.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHuonker, John Walter.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effective management of professionals requires achieving a balance between organizational control and professional autonomy. The problem of achieving a balance is important currently in the United States healthcare industry. This dissertation examined the antecedents and consequences of physician autonomy in both traditional fee-for-service (FFS) and non-traditional managed care settings. The population of physicians in one county were surveyed. Two models were developed arguing that physician practice choice affects autonomy. The antecedents and consequences of autonomy were compared both between FFS and managed care practice and between different types of managed care organizations (MCOs). Results indicate that most physicians in the survey area choose managed care practice, and the value physicians place on income is positively associated with the volume of patients from MCOs. FFS practice generated greater autonomy than MCO practice, and autonomy within MCOs positively affected practice satisfaction. Group practice positively affected autonomy within MCOs. Autonomy did not vary across different MCO types but was influenced by the process variables physician decision involvement and organizational formalization, thus suggesting that classifying organizations by autonomy requires knowledge of the processes used in the MCO.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectHealth services administration.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineManagement and Policyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBurns, Lawton R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBeach, Lee Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGottfredson, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPowell, Walter F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421727en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721356344en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.