Health locus-of-control, health beliefs and family planning behavior among Middle Eastern women living in the United States.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186495
Title:
Health locus-of-control, health beliefs and family planning behavior among Middle Eastern women living in the United States.
Author:
Mahmoud, Nadia Mohamed
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the relationships among health locus of control, health beliefs and family planning behavior among Middle Eastern women living temporarily in the United States. A correlational descriptive design was used. A convenience sample of 80 Middle Eastern women were chosen as representatives for this study from the University of Arizona Family Housing, Tucson Islamic Center, Saudi Arabian Student Club, and the University of Arizona International Student Center. Four instruments were utilized to collect data: (1) Health Locus of Control Scale, (2) Modified Health Belief Instrument, (3) Demographic/Preferences Data Tool, and (4) Family Planning Survey. Data analysis included use of descriptive statistics to summarize the differences between the two groups (adequate and inadequate contraceptive users) on each set of health belief variables, health locus of control variables and demographic/preferences variables. Significant findings on the health belief and health locus of control instruments, separately and together was followed by stepwise discriminant analysis to identify the variables on which the groups differ and the nature of the dimensions on which they differ. The study findings indicated that adequate contraceptive users perceived the seriousness of pregnancy and benefits of contraception, while inadequate contraceptive users perceived barriers of contraception. On the other hand adequate contraceptive users had self-control over health, belief in provider control over health, had less general health threat, and more health value than inadequate contraceptive users. Four variables in the health belief and health locus of control scales were included in a discriminant function analysis. This indicated that general health, self-control over health, barriers of contraception and seriousness of pregnancy variables fully differentiated the two groups.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's studies.; Dissertations, Academic.; Contraception Behavior.; Women.; Islam.; Cultural Characteristics.; Acculturation.; Patient Acceptance of Health Care.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Sherman, Jacqueline

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHealth locus-of-control, health beliefs and family planning behavior among Middle Eastern women living in the United States.en_US
dc.creatorMahmoud, Nadia Mohameden_US
dc.contributor.authorMahmoud, Nadia Mohameden_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the relationships among health locus of control, health beliefs and family planning behavior among Middle Eastern women living temporarily in the United States. A correlational descriptive design was used. A convenience sample of 80 Middle Eastern women were chosen as representatives for this study from the University of Arizona Family Housing, Tucson Islamic Center, Saudi Arabian Student Club, and the University of Arizona International Student Center. Four instruments were utilized to collect data: (1) Health Locus of Control Scale, (2) Modified Health Belief Instrument, (3) Demographic/Preferences Data Tool, and (4) Family Planning Survey. Data analysis included use of descriptive statistics to summarize the differences between the two groups (adequate and inadequate contraceptive users) on each set of health belief variables, health locus of control variables and demographic/preferences variables. Significant findings on the health belief and health locus of control instruments, separately and together was followed by stepwise discriminant analysis to identify the variables on which the groups differ and the nature of the dimensions on which they differ. The study findings indicated that adequate contraceptive users perceived the seriousness of pregnancy and benefits of contraception, while inadequate contraceptive users perceived barriers of contraception. On the other hand adequate contraceptive users had self-control over health, belief in provider control over health, had less general health threat, and more health value than inadequate contraceptive users. Four variables in the health belief and health locus of control scales were included in a discriminant function analysis. This indicated that general health, self-control over health, barriers of contraception and seriousness of pregnancy variables fully differentiated the two groups.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's studies.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectContraception Behavior.en_US
dc.subjectWomen.en_US
dc.subjectIslam.en_US
dc.subjectCultural Characteristics.en_US
dc.subjectAcculturation.en_US
dc.subjectPatient Acceptance of Health Care.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSherman, Jacquelineen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSennott-Miller, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlexander, Mary A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHirschi, Travisen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFernandez, Celestinoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9421724en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701511659en_US
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