Care seeking and elders' dependency work: "My time is occupied trying to live".

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186486
Title:
Care seeking and elders' dependency work: "My time is occupied trying to live".
Author:
Russell, Cynthia Kay.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Even though a plethora of research is devoted to explicating caregivers' experiences, comparatively there is a dearth of information about care recipients. The purpose of this study was to further theoretical and empirical understanding of care recipients' experiences within care relationships. Specifically, this study was concerned with identifying the strategies elders use to seek care and how the processes and characteristics of individual, interpersonal, and structural levels interact to affect elders' care seeking. A synthesized symbolic interactionist and life span developmental framework informed the research. Multiple qualitative field work methods (semi-structured interviews, participant observation, focus group) were utilized to collect information about care recipients who were representative of the variety of care relationships within a life care retirement community. The care seeking process emerged as a sequence of activities engaged in as elders elicited care from others and negotiated care with others. Of most conceptual interest, however, was elders' dependency work: The work elders engaged in as they not only sought care for a specific need but also situated each care occasion within past experiences of care and future possibilities for care. Dependency work was agency in action, serving to define the everyday lives of elders involved in care relationships. The findings of this study suggest the need for viewing care recipients as agents, actively being with others in their delicate dance of dependency.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Gerontology.; Dissertations, Academic.; Aged -- psychology.; Attitude to Health.; Patient Acceptance of Health Care.; Self Care.; Long-Term Care.; Aged.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Phillips, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCare seeking and elders' dependency work: "My time is occupied trying to live".en_US
dc.creatorRussell, Cynthia Kay.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Cynthia Kay.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEven though a plethora of research is devoted to explicating caregivers' experiences, comparatively there is a dearth of information about care recipients. The purpose of this study was to further theoretical and empirical understanding of care recipients' experiences within care relationships. Specifically, this study was concerned with identifying the strategies elders use to seek care and how the processes and characteristics of individual, interpersonal, and structural levels interact to affect elders' care seeking. A synthesized symbolic interactionist and life span developmental framework informed the research. Multiple qualitative field work methods (semi-structured interviews, participant observation, focus group) were utilized to collect information about care recipients who were representative of the variety of care relationships within a life care retirement community. The care seeking process emerged as a sequence of activities engaged in as elders elicited care from others and negotiated care with others. Of most conceptual interest, however, was elders' dependency work: The work elders engaged in as they not only sought care for a specific need but also situated each care occasion within past experiences of care and future possibilities for care. Dependency work was agency in action, serving to define the everyday lives of elders involved in care relationships. The findings of this study suggest the need for viewing care recipients as agents, actively being with others in their delicate dance of dependency.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGerontology.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectAged -- psychology.en_US
dc.subjectAttitude to Health.en_US
dc.subjectPatient Acceptance of Health Care.en_US
dc.subjectSelf Care.en_US
dc.subjectLong-Term Care.en_US
dc.subjectAged.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBraden, Carrie Joen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberReed, Pamela G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSnow, Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMorrill, Calvinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410686en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701497702en_US
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