PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION AGREEMENT IN BEHAVIORAL AND PSYCHODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT INTERVIEWS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186482
Title:
PROBLEM IDENTIFICATION AGREEMENT IN BEHAVIORAL AND PSYCHODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT INTERVIEWS.
Author:
LeBlanc, Cobbie P.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study questions whether it is possible to show greater interviewer agreement on client's problems as a result of training. The study examined the comparison of the behavioral assessment interview, the psychodynamic assessment interview, and a no-training control interview. Additionally, four other dependent variables were examined which related to effectiveness of interview format: proportion of problems identified of those mentioned by the client, number of problems mentioned by the client, total number of problems identified by the interviewer, and number of interviewer errors per interview. The results demonstrated that behavioral interviewers had significantly higher agreement than the psychodynamic and no-training control. Behavioral interviewers were also significantly comprehensive in that they better identified a higher proportion of the problems mentioned by clients than the other two groups. Consistently, although not significantly, the behavioral interviewers identified more problems overall than the other two groups, although the number of problems mentioned by clients did not vary by group. The surprising findings of the study is that behavioral interviewers made significantly more errors per interview than the others, despite their effectiveness in obtaining interviewer agreement on client problem reports.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Interviewing in mental health.; Psychology -- Study and teaching -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Arkowitz, Harold S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePROBLEM IDENTIFICATION AGREEMENT IN BEHAVIORAL AND PSYCHODYNAMIC ASSESSMENT INTERVIEWS.en_US
dc.creatorLeBlanc, Cobbie P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLeBlanc, Cobbie P.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study questions whether it is possible to show greater interviewer agreement on client's problems as a result of training. The study examined the comparison of the behavioral assessment interview, the psychodynamic assessment interview, and a no-training control interview. Additionally, four other dependent variables were examined which related to effectiveness of interview format: proportion of problems identified of those mentioned by the client, number of problems mentioned by the client, total number of problems identified by the interviewer, and number of interviewer errors per interview. The results demonstrated that behavioral interviewers had significantly higher agreement than the psychodynamic and no-training control. Behavioral interviewers were also significantly comprehensive in that they better identified a higher proportion of the problems mentioned by clients than the other two groups. Consistently, although not significantly, the behavioral interviewers identified more problems overall than the other two groups, although the number of problems mentioned by clients did not vary by group. The surprising findings of the study is that behavioral interviewers made significantly more errors per interview than the others, despite their effectiveness in obtaining interviewer agreement on client problem reports.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectInterviewing in mental health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology -- Study and teaching -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorArkowitz, Harold S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8319724en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689058081en_US
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