Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186478
Title:
Minorities in science and engineering: Patterns for success.
Author:
Rodriguez, Carlos Mario.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore the bases of minority student persistence in Science and Engineering (S/E). Statistical and qualitative methods were employed. Undergraduate minority student graduation rates in S/E from 1981 to 1990 were analyzed at 1,492 public and private U.S. colleges and universities and a national field study component, which included surveys and interviews, was conducted. The results indicated that effective persistence strategies for African American, Hispanic and Native American students would involve assisting students to clarify goals, facilitating minority students as role models for each other, developing peer tutoring to maintain continuous study skills enhancement, engaging faculty in social interactions with students, and enhancing financial support. Explaining the sources and reasons for success in minority student persistence in S/E could impact national educational policy and collegiate level practices in order to increase retention.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Minorities in science -- United States.; Minorities in engineering -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Leslie, Larry L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMinorities in science and engineering: Patterns for success.en_US
dc.creatorRodriguez, Carlos Mario.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, Carlos Mario.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the bases of minority student persistence in Science and Engineering (S/E). Statistical and qualitative methods were employed. Undergraduate minority student graduation rates in S/E from 1981 to 1990 were analyzed at 1,492 public and private U.S. colleges and universities and a national field study component, which included surveys and interviews, was conducted. The results indicated that effective persistence strategies for African American, Hispanic and Native American students would involve assisting students to clarify goals, facilitating minority students as role models for each other, developing peer tutoring to maintain continuous study skills enhancement, engaging faculty in social interactions with students, and enhancing financial support. Explaining the sources and reasons for success in minority student persistence in S/E could impact national educational policy and collegiate level practices in order to increase retention.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMinorities in science -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectMinorities in engineering -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLeslie, Larry L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWoodward, Dougen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFernandez, Celestinoen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410678en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702422886en_US
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