Feedback timeliness and addressability in computer-mediated decision-making.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186477
Title:
Feedback timeliness and addressability in computer-mediated decision-making.
Author:
Fuller, Mark Allen.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates the effects of Message Timeliness (the speed at which a response to a message becomes available to the sender of an original message) and Message Addressability (the ability to target a response message to a source message) on decision making in groups using collaborative technology. Message Timeliness and Message Addressability were studied in two contexts, within and across two types of collaborative technology. The collaborative technology used in this research was an Electronic Meeting System. Two laboratory experiments were employed to manipulate the independent variables. Both studies incorporate a 2 x 2 design. The first study crosses Message Timeliness (the speed at which a response to a message becomes available to the sender of a original message) with Media (two different software programs within the EMS), and examines its impact on convergent group behavior at the individual and group level. The second study crosses Message Addressability (the ability to target a response message to a source message) with Media. Dependent variables were the same as in study one. The subjects, upper-level, undergraduate business students, were asked to discuss a human resource task and come to a unanimous group decision. The collaborative technology used for communication in this study allowed for group members to enter, and then send their comments to the other group members in a non-anonymous manner. Measures of convergence, for both studies, were taken at the individual and group level. Mediating variables were measured using questionnaires which were administered after the task was completed. For study one, Message Timeliness was found to have a positive significant relationship with the three mediating variables Conversational Coherence, Attribution of Effort, and Satisfaction with Process. Conversational Coherence and Satisfaction with Process were found to have a positive significant relationship with Group Consensus measured on the individual level. The relationship with Attribution of Effort was also significant, but negative. Satisfaction with Process also had a positive significant relationship with Individual Convergence. In study two, Message Addressability (MA) was found to have a significant positive relationship with both Conversational Coherence and Satisfaction with Process.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Information science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Vogel, Douglas R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFeedback timeliness and addressability in computer-mediated decision-making.en_US
dc.creatorFuller, Mark Allen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFuller, Mark Allen.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the effects of Message Timeliness (the speed at which a response to a message becomes available to the sender of an original message) and Message Addressability (the ability to target a response message to a source message) on decision making in groups using collaborative technology. Message Timeliness and Message Addressability were studied in two contexts, within and across two types of collaborative technology. The collaborative technology used in this research was an Electronic Meeting System. Two laboratory experiments were employed to manipulate the independent variables. Both studies incorporate a 2 x 2 design. The first study crosses Message Timeliness (the speed at which a response to a message becomes available to the sender of a original message) with Media (two different software programs within the EMS), and examines its impact on convergent group behavior at the individual and group level. The second study crosses Message Addressability (the ability to target a response message to a source message) with Media. Dependent variables were the same as in study one. The subjects, upper-level, undergraduate business students, were asked to discuss a human resource task and come to a unanimous group decision. The collaborative technology used for communication in this study allowed for group members to enter, and then send their comments to the other group members in a non-anonymous manner. Measures of convergence, for both studies, were taken at the individual and group level. Mediating variables were measured using questionnaires which were administered after the task was completed. For study one, Message Timeliness was found to have a positive significant relationship with the three mediating variables Conversational Coherence, Attribution of Effort, and Satisfaction with Process. Conversational Coherence and Satisfaction with Process were found to have a positive significant relationship with Group Consensus measured on the individual level. The relationship with Attribution of Effort was also significant, but negative. Satisfaction with Process also had a positive significant relationship with Individual Convergence. In study two, Message Addressability (MA) was found to have a significant positive relationship with both Conversational Coherence and Satisfaction with Process.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectInformation science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairVogel, Douglas R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPingry, David E.en
dc.identifier.proquest9410677en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720693081en_US
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