The U.S. foreign policy in the Persian Gulf, 1968-1988: From regional surrogate to direct military involvement.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186474
Title:
The U.S. foreign policy in the Persian Gulf, 1968-1988: From regional surrogate to direct military involvement.
Author:
Bahramzadeh, Mohammad Ali.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examines the U.S. foreign policy toward the Persian Gulf from 1968 to 1988 with an attempt to explain why and how particular U.S. foreign policy decisions were made. It further attempts to determine whether each president, within this time frame, pursued a different foreign policy toward the region. The indicators used to longitudinally measure foreign policy change were trade, both imports and exports between the U.S. and the Persian Gulf countries, bilateral treaties between them, and U.S. military sales to them. By examining the effect of presidential succession on selected patterns of American foreign policy behavior toward the area it is apparent that the pattern of interaction exhibits a clear continuity and in fact different administrations have not drastically altered the fundamental thrust of U.S. foreign policy. Furthermore, from a broad historical perspective, this study challenges the conventional notion that U.S. foreign policy has been "short-sighted" and often erratic. By examining two case studies, namely the Iran-Iraq war and U.S. decision to reflag Kuwaiti oil tankers, one can readily see that U.S. foreign policy is far from being reactive in its approach. In general, the evident suggests that the U.S. foreign policy in the Persian Gulf, in a broad conceptual framework, can be explained as a part of the rational decision making process where the U.S. foreign policy makers select the alternatives best suited to maximize the strategic goals and objectives.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science.; History, Modern.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Whiting, Allen S.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe U.S. foreign policy in the Persian Gulf, 1968-1988: From regional surrogate to direct military involvement.en_US
dc.creatorBahramzadeh, Mohammad Ali.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBahramzadeh, Mohammad Ali.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the U.S. foreign policy toward the Persian Gulf from 1968 to 1988 with an attempt to explain why and how particular U.S. foreign policy decisions were made. It further attempts to determine whether each president, within this time frame, pursued a different foreign policy toward the region. The indicators used to longitudinally measure foreign policy change were trade, both imports and exports between the U.S. and the Persian Gulf countries, bilateral treaties between them, and U.S. military sales to them. By examining the effect of presidential succession on selected patterns of American foreign policy behavior toward the area it is apparent that the pattern of interaction exhibits a clear continuity and in fact different administrations have not drastically altered the fundamental thrust of U.S. foreign policy. Furthermore, from a broad historical perspective, this study challenges the conventional notion that U.S. foreign policy has been "short-sighted" and often erratic. By examining two case studies, namely the Iran-Iraq war and U.S. decision to reflag Kuwaiti oil tankers, one can readily see that U.S. foreign policy is far from being reactive in its approach. In general, the evident suggests that the U.S. foreign policy in the Persian Gulf, in a broad conceptual framework, can be explained as a part of the rational decision making process where the U.S. foreign policy makers select the alternatives best suited to maximize the strategic goals and objectives.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Modern.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairWhiting, Allen S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWahlke, John C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMuller, Edward N.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410674en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700942975en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.