Maintaining well-being in arthritis: Mediators of the adversive condition.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186461
Title:
Maintaining well-being in arthritis: Mediators of the adversive condition.
Author:
Arslanian, Christine Lucy.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to test the relationships between and among the concepts of severity of illness, dependency, uncertainty, functional status and the mediators of self-esteem and mastery relative to the outcome of wellbeing. The conceptual framework was adapted from various sources in the literature which support the concept of wellbeing as an important outcome in arthritis. Evidence also supports self-esteem and mastery as mediators of the chronic illness experience. Dependency, uncertainty and functional status have been shown to be predictors of wellbeing but have never been tested as a complete paradigm. The sample for the study was 128 patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Subjects completed 7 questionnaires which measured the 7 variables under study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the demographic characteristics of the sample. Multiple regression technique was used to empirically test the predicted theoretical concepts and to estimate predictive validity for the theoretical concepts. The results demonstrated that when self-esteem was used in the causal model, 58% of the variance in wellbeing was explained by self-esteem and uncertainty. When mastery was included instead of self-esteem 52% of the variance of wellbeing was explained by mastery and uncertainty. When tested as mediators, both self-esteem and mastery emerged as significant mediators of dependency, uncertainty and functional status relative to wellbeing. These results are of clinical use to nurses who, by virtue of working with these patients on a daily basis, are in a position to intervene with actions which encourage positive self-esteem and maintain mastery over the environment. If these actions are successful, then wellbeing can be maintained for those patients diagnosed with arthritis.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Self-esteem.; Dissertations, Academic.; Arthritis -- psychology.; Chronic Disease -- psychology.; Adaptation, Psychological.; Self Concept.; Attitude to Health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Crosby, Leanna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMaintaining well-being in arthritis: Mediators of the adversive condition.en_US
dc.creatorArslanian, Christine Lucy.en_US
dc.contributor.authorArslanian, Christine Lucy.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to test the relationships between and among the concepts of severity of illness, dependency, uncertainty, functional status and the mediators of self-esteem and mastery relative to the outcome of wellbeing. The conceptual framework was adapted from various sources in the literature which support the concept of wellbeing as an important outcome in arthritis. Evidence also supports self-esteem and mastery as mediators of the chronic illness experience. Dependency, uncertainty and functional status have been shown to be predictors of wellbeing but have never been tested as a complete paradigm. The sample for the study was 128 patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Subjects completed 7 questionnaires which measured the 7 variables under study. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the demographic characteristics of the sample. Multiple regression technique was used to empirically test the predicted theoretical concepts and to estimate predictive validity for the theoretical concepts. The results demonstrated that when self-esteem was used in the causal model, 58% of the variance in wellbeing was explained by self-esteem and uncertainty. When mastery was included instead of self-esteem 52% of the variance of wellbeing was explained by mastery and uncertainty. When tested as mediators, both self-esteem and mastery emerged as significant mediators of dependency, uncertainty and functional status relative to wellbeing. These results are of clinical use to nurses who, by virtue of working with these patients on a daily basis, are in a position to intervene with actions which encourage positive self-esteem and maintain mastery over the environment. If these actions are successful, then wellbeing can be maintained for those patients diagnosed with arthritis.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSelf-esteem.en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectArthritis -- psychology.en_US
dc.subjectChronic Disease -- psychology.en_US
dc.subjectAdaptation, Psychological.en_US
dc.subjectSelf Concept.en_US
dc.subjectAttitude to Health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairCrosby, Leannaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBraden, Carrie Joen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLongman, Alice J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDaniel, Terryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSchwartz, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410662en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701508772en_US
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