GENERALIZING SKILLS FROM A COUNSELOR-TRAINING PROGRAM TO EMPLOYMENT: AN ANALYSIS BASED ON BANDURA'S OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING PARADIGM.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186459
Title:
GENERALIZING SKILLS FROM A COUNSELOR-TRAINING PROGRAM TO EMPLOYMENT: AN ANALYSIS BASED ON BANDURA'S OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING PARADIGM.
Author:
HOLIMAN, MARJORIE ANN.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to gather, report and analyze the experiences of fourteen counselor-trainees in one university training program, using a variety of research methods over time. Bandura's observational learning paradigm, that individuals learn by imitating models, provided the structure for analyzing samples of audio-taped counseling sessions, as well as interviews and journals collected over a two-year period. Participant observation and content analysis were the principal methods used to gather and analyze data. Frequencies on audio-tapes were determined by external raters. Analysis of the interviews and journals was completed by the author. At acquisition, participants did imitate a model's attending skills demonstration, and other significant modeling influences were related to the theoretical orientations of the models. When experts and participants were compared, experts were using all behavior categories except accepting statements more frequently than participants. At the end of the training program, participants were more active than they were at a baseline observation, a finding consistent with previous longitudinal studies of maintenance of skills. The frequencies for each of the ten behavior categories, however, were variable over trials. This finding may be the result of variations in the behavior of models or of methodological problems in analyzing the data. Trainee statements about training experiences and norms of reference groups, collected from interviews and journal entries, indicate that trainees model trainer values and ideas as well as behaviors. Trainees described a developmental process during training, but conclusions from post-graduation employment experiences were too limited to analyze. The study's recommendations include possible research projects for training programs and guidelines for developing a supportive trainer/trainee relationship.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Counseling -- Study and teaching (Higher); Counseling -- Vocational guidance.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGENERALIZING SKILLS FROM A COUNSELOR-TRAINING PROGRAM TO EMPLOYMENT: AN ANALYSIS BASED ON BANDURA'S OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING PARADIGM.en_US
dc.creatorHOLIMAN, MARJORIE ANN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHOLIMAN, MARJORIE ANN.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to gather, report and analyze the experiences of fourteen counselor-trainees in one university training program, using a variety of research methods over time. Bandura's observational learning paradigm, that individuals learn by imitating models, provided the structure for analyzing samples of audio-taped counseling sessions, as well as interviews and journals collected over a two-year period. Participant observation and content analysis were the principal methods used to gather and analyze data. Frequencies on audio-tapes were determined by external raters. Analysis of the interviews and journals was completed by the author. At acquisition, participants did imitate a model's attending skills demonstration, and other significant modeling influences were related to the theoretical orientations of the models. When experts and participants were compared, experts were using all behavior categories except accepting statements more frequently than participants. At the end of the training program, participants were more active than they were at a baseline observation, a finding consistent with previous longitudinal studies of maintenance of skills. The frequencies for each of the ten behavior categories, however, were variable over trials. This finding may be the result of variations in the behavior of models or of methodological problems in analyzing the data. Trainee statements about training experiences and norms of reference groups, collected from interviews and journal entries, indicate that trainees model trainer values and ideas as well as behaviors. Trainees described a developmental process during training, but conclusions from post-graduation employment experiences were too limited to analyze. The study's recommendations include possible research projects for training programs and guidelines for developing a supportive trainer/trainee relationship.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCounseling -- Study and teaching (Higher)en_US
dc.subjectCounseling -- Vocational guidance.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217421en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681756249en_US
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