Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186454
Title:
Daytime sleepiness and sleep-wake schedules.
Author:
Manber, Rachel.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study assessed the differential effects of three manipulations of the sleep-wake schedules of college students on their levels of daytime sleepiness as measured by daily subjective ratings. The study was longitudinal and prospective. Following a baseline period (12 days), three experimental conditions were introduced. In the first group students were asked to sleep at least 7.5 hours at night and to avoid taking naps. In the second group, students were asked in addition to follow a regular sleep wake schedule. In the third group students were asked to sleep at least 7 hours at night and to take daily naps. The experimental phase lasted four weeks and overall, compliance was good. A follow up phase (one week) began five weeks past the termination of the experimental phase. The findings indicate that when nocturnal sleep is not deprived, regularization of the sleep-wake schedules lead to reduced sleepiness and improved psychological and cognitive functioning. Subjects in the regular schedule condition experienced greater and longer lasting improvements in their alertness compared with subjects in the other two groups combined. Napping was not found to produce any change in daytime sleepiness, but subjects who had greater increases in the regularity of nap frequency experienced greater decrease in daytime sleepiness. Subjects with evening tendencies benefited most from regularizing their sleep schedules whereas subjects with morning tendencies benefited most from taking naps.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Clinical psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bootzin, Richard R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDaytime sleepiness and sleep-wake schedules.en_US
dc.creatorManber, Rachel.en_US
dc.contributor.authorManber, Rachel.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study assessed the differential effects of three manipulations of the sleep-wake schedules of college students on their levels of daytime sleepiness as measured by daily subjective ratings. The study was longitudinal and prospective. Following a baseline period (12 days), three experimental conditions were introduced. In the first group students were asked to sleep at least 7.5 hours at night and to avoid taking naps. In the second group, students were asked in addition to follow a regular sleep wake schedule. In the third group students were asked to sleep at least 7 hours at night and to take daily naps. The experimental phase lasted four weeks and overall, compliance was good. A follow up phase (one week) began five weeks past the termination of the experimental phase. The findings indicate that when nocturnal sleep is not deprived, regularization of the sleep-wake schedules lead to reduced sleepiness and improved psychological and cognitive functioning. Subjects in the regular schedule condition experienced greater and longer lasting improvements in their alertness compared with subjects in the other two groups combined. Napping was not found to produce any change in daytime sleepiness, but subjects who had greater increases in the regularity of nap frequency experienced greater decrease in daytime sleepiness. Subjects with evening tendencies benefited most from regularizing their sleep schedules whereas subjects with morning tendencies benefited most from taking naps.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectClinical psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBootzin, Richard R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKaszniak, Alfreden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShisslak, Catherineen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410656en_US
dc.identifier.oclc721329787en_US
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