The effects of income on food and nutritional status in the Middle Eastern area (1960-1985).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186452
Title:
The effects of income on food and nutritional status in the Middle Eastern area (1960-1985).
Author:
Younis, Sadoon Jumah
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The income of most countries of the Middle East grew rapidly after 1973 when the price of oil dramatically increased. To examine the effect of the income growth on food and nutrition status, eleven countries were chosen from the Middle Eastern area. These include Algeria, Libya, and Saudi Arabia, which are oil exporting countries, Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia and Yemen, which are labor exporting countries, and Jordan, Sudan, Syria and turkey, which are agricultural producing countries. The variables of this study are per capita income, food consumption, which includes wheat, rice, corn, total grain, beef, poultry and egg, and social indicators, which include population per physician, crude birth rate, crude death rate, infant mortality rate, child death rate and life expectancy. The data for these variables were collected from 1960-1985. Single and multiple regression analysis were used to explain the effects of change in per capita income on food consumption and social indicators. The results of this analysis showed that income change had a significant impact on food consumption especially on egg, beef and poultry with income elasticities more than one. However, the income elasticities of wheat, rice, corn and total grain consumption were less than one for most of the countries. In addition, income growth had a negative effect on crude birth rate, crude death rate, infant mortality rate and child death rate. As hypothesized, population per physician and life expectancy increased.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Arid Land Resource Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fox, Roger

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effects of income on food and nutritional status in the Middle Eastern area (1960-1985).en_US
dc.creatorYounis, Sadoon Jumahen_US
dc.contributor.authorYounis, Sadoon Jumahen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe income of most countries of the Middle East grew rapidly after 1973 when the price of oil dramatically increased. To examine the effect of the income growth on food and nutrition status, eleven countries were chosen from the Middle Eastern area. These include Algeria, Libya, and Saudi Arabia, which are oil exporting countries, Egypt, Morocco, Tunisia and Yemen, which are labor exporting countries, and Jordan, Sudan, Syria and turkey, which are agricultural producing countries. The variables of this study are per capita income, food consumption, which includes wheat, rice, corn, total grain, beef, poultry and egg, and social indicators, which include population per physician, crude birth rate, crude death rate, infant mortality rate, child death rate and life expectancy. The data for these variables were collected from 1960-1985. Single and multiple regression analysis were used to explain the effects of change in per capita income on food consumption and social indicators. The results of this analysis showed that income change had a significant impact on food consumption especially on egg, beef and poultry with income elasticities more than one. However, the income elasticities of wheat, rice, corn and total grain consumption were less than one for most of the countries. In addition, income growth had a negative effect on crude birth rate, crude death rate, infant mortality rate and child death rate. As hypothesized, population per physician and life expectancy increased.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArid Land Resource Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFox, Rogeren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHutchinson, Chucken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAjami, Amir I.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410654en_US
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