Gender differences in cooperative computer-based foreign language tasks.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186451
Title:
Gender differences in cooperative computer-based foreign language tasks.
Author:
Meunier-Cinko, Lydie Elisabeth
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigates the issue of gender differences in computer-based foreign language activities. The experiment, conducted at the University of Arizona in the Fall of 1992, used as subjects students (N = 60) enrolled in intermediate French classes. Students were assigned to mixed- or same-gender dyads. All dyads engaged in a French cooperative task at the computer. The software-based pre- and posttests were composed of two parts: (1) vocabulary pertaining to description of people, and (2) geographical knowledge. Gain scores indicated no significant difference in overall learning between genders and dyad types. Further analysis of subscores revealed that females outperformed males significantly (p =.02) in learning vocabulary pertaining to description of people. Males outperformed females numerically in learning geographical facts. Differences between mixed- and same-gender dyads suggest that females tend to acquiesce to male factual preferences in mixed-gender dyads. The analysis of interaction patterns at the computer revealed that females tended to share keyboard control more than males in same-gender dyads. And, males tended to use more management statements with female partners than with male partners. Results from the MBTI personality test indicated that males and females tended to have different learning profiles. The analysis of gain scores indicated that overall, NFs and NTs learned significantly more than STs. Personality profiles also showed a significant effect (p =.03) on keyboard control. EJs controlled the keyboard significantly more than the other types. Likewise, results revealed a significant effect of personalities on overall amount of talk (p =.04), management statements (p =.02), and task statements (p =.06). EJs spoke more and used more management statements than the other types when in control of the keyboard. When not in control of the keyboard, EPs and IJs spoke more than the other types. Interestingly 'non-keyboard controllers' tended to compensate for the lack of keyboard control with verbal control. The overall results of this study established that learning achievement and interaction patterns were more strongly related to personality differences than to gender differences.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Educational technology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Second Language Acquisition and Teaching; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ariew, Robert A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleGender differences in cooperative computer-based foreign language tasks.en_US
dc.creatorMeunier-Cinko, Lydie Elisabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeunier-Cinko, Lydie Elisabethen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigates the issue of gender differences in computer-based foreign language activities. The experiment, conducted at the University of Arizona in the Fall of 1992, used as subjects students (N = 60) enrolled in intermediate French classes. Students were assigned to mixed- or same-gender dyads. All dyads engaged in a French cooperative task at the computer. The software-based pre- and posttests were composed of two parts: (1) vocabulary pertaining to description of people, and (2) geographical knowledge. Gain scores indicated no significant difference in overall learning between genders and dyad types. Further analysis of subscores revealed that females outperformed males significantly (p =.02) in learning vocabulary pertaining to description of people. Males outperformed females numerically in learning geographical facts. Differences between mixed- and same-gender dyads suggest that females tend to acquiesce to male factual preferences in mixed-gender dyads. The analysis of interaction patterns at the computer revealed that females tended to share keyboard control more than males in same-gender dyads. And, males tended to use more management statements with female partners than with male partners. Results from the MBTI personality test indicated that males and females tended to have different learning profiles. The analysis of gain scores indicated that overall, NFs and NTs learned significantly more than STs. Personality profiles also showed a significant effect (p =.03) on keyboard control. EJs controlled the keyboard significantly more than the other types. Likewise, results revealed a significant effect of personalities on overall amount of talk (p =.04), management statements (p =.02), and task statements (p =.06). EJs spoke more and used more management statements than the other types when in control of the keyboard. When not in control of the keyboard, EPs and IJs spoke more than the other types. Interestingly 'non-keyboard controllers' tended to compensate for the lack of keyboard control with verbal control. The overall results of this study established that learning achievement and interaction patterns were more strongly related to personality differences than to gender differences.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducational technology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition and Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairAriew, Robert A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJohnson, Donna M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGoodman, Kennethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9410653en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720686932en_US
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