DIFFERENCES IN PRACTICES AND EDUCATIONAL PREPARATION AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELORS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186448
Title:
DIFFERENCES IN PRACTICES AND EDUCATIONAL PREPARATION AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELORS.
Author:
HENRY, PHILIP NAPHTALIA.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there were significant differences in practices and educational preparation among secondary school counselors. Five research questions and 130 hypotheses were formulated on the theory that counselor practices and educational background differ when counselors are categorized by various school environments. Data for the study were supplied by the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972, specifically, the School File Documentation which includes counselor questionnaires from 1,057 secondary schools. One counselor questionnaire was selected from each of the schools to be included in the study. A chi square test was administered to find out if discrepancies among categorical groups were significant. The study found that major differences existed among groups classified under national geographical region, public and private control, and school location. Few differences were found among groups classified under the percentage of minority students in the school and the percentage of teachers with advanced degrees in the school. Results indicate that counselor practices and educational preparation are strongly influenced by geographical region, type of administrative control, and school location. While the study did not focus on the amount of training experienced by counselors, indication are that a sizable proportion of secondary school counselors had not taken any courses in educational, personal/family, or vocational counseling. Few in the sample had taken courses in minority group counseling. By the same token, a lack of practicum hours in these areas was also shown.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Student counselors -- Training of -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDIFFERENCES IN PRACTICES AND EDUCATIONAL PREPARATION AMONG SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELORS.en_US
dc.creatorHENRY, PHILIP NAPHTALIA.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHENRY, PHILIP NAPHTALIA.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there were significant differences in practices and educational preparation among secondary school counselors. Five research questions and 130 hypotheses were formulated on the theory that counselor practices and educational background differ when counselors are categorized by various school environments. Data for the study were supplied by the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972, specifically, the School File Documentation which includes counselor questionnaires from 1,057 secondary schools. One counselor questionnaire was selected from each of the schools to be included in the study. A chi square test was administered to find out if discrepancies among categorical groups were significant. The study found that major differences existed among groups classified under national geographical region, public and private control, and school location. Few differences were found among groups classified under the percentage of minority students in the school and the percentage of teachers with advanced degrees in the school. Results indicate that counselor practices and educational preparation are strongly influenced by geographical region, type of administrative control, and school location. While the study did not focus on the amount of training experienced by counselors, indication are that a sizable proportion of secondary school counselors had not taken any courses in educational, personal/family, or vocational counseling. Few in the sample had taken courses in minority group counseling. By the same token, a lack of practicum hours in these areas was also shown.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectStudent counselors -- Training of -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8319721en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689052337en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.