Nurses' recognition and identification of elder abuse by caregivers.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186445
Title:
Nurses' recognition and identification of elder abuse by caregivers.
Author:
Presley, Ann Frances Cullen.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purposes of this secondary study were to explore the case detection phenomena of elder abuse by determining the congruence between nurses' assessments of abuse and elders' self-reports of abuse; to identify factors that may account for differences between abusive situations and nonabusive situations; then to describe differences between abused elders correctly identified and abused elders incorrectly identified by nurses. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used. The theory of attribution directed this research. The conceptual framework consisted of four concepts: structural factors, relationship factors, elder factors, and caregiver factors. A descriptive-comparison design was used to address the research questions. The sample included 48 elder-caregiver dyads, of whom 24 were self-reported abused elders and 24 self-reported nonabused elders. Descriptive analysis was used, including chi-square and t-tests. Results indicated that the nurses' assessments of elder abuse and elders' self reports of abuse were congruent in only one-fifth (N = 5) of the abused cases (N = 24). The findings confirmed allegations that nurses have difficulty identifying elder abuse unless outright battering is observed. Five variables were significant between abused and nonabused elders, and 10 variables were significant between abused elders correctly identified by nurses and abused elders incorrectly identified by nurses.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Elder Abuse -- diagnosis; Long-Term Care; Aged; Geriatric Nursing
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nursing; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Phillips, Linda R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNurses' recognition and identification of elder abuse by caregivers.en_US
dc.creatorPresley, Ann Frances Cullen.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPresley, Ann Frances Cullen.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purposes of this secondary study were to explore the case detection phenomena of elder abuse by determining the congruence between nurses' assessments of abuse and elders' self-reports of abuse; to identify factors that may account for differences between abusive situations and nonabusive situations; then to describe differences between abused elders correctly identified and abused elders incorrectly identified by nurses. Both quantitative and qualitative data were used. The theory of attribution directed this research. The conceptual framework consisted of four concepts: structural factors, relationship factors, elder factors, and caregiver factors. A descriptive-comparison design was used to address the research questions. The sample included 48 elder-caregiver dyads, of whom 24 were self-reported abused elders and 24 self-reported nonabused elders. Descriptive analysis was used, including chi-square and t-tests. Results indicated that the nurses' assessments of elder abuse and elders' self reports of abuse were congruent in only one-fifth (N = 5) of the abused cases (N = 24). The findings confirmed allegations that nurses have difficulty identifying elder abuse unless outright battering is observed. Five variables were significant between abused and nonabused elders, and 10 variables were significant between abused elders correctly identified by nurses and abused elders incorrectly identified by nurses.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectElder Abuse -- diagnosisen_US
dc.subjectLong-Term Careen_US
dc.subjectAgeden_US
dc.subjectGeriatric Nursingen_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairPhillips, Linda R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPergrin, Jessie V.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKahn, Marvin W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDomino, Georgeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCord, Beverlyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408518en_US
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