Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186430
Title:
The effects of early experience on the hippocampus.
Author:
Wilson, Lynn Allison.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Some experiences occurring early in life affect structure and function of the nervous system. Handling and isolation of infant rats produce physiological and behavioral changes that persist throughout life. These changes may result from interference with the maturation of late developing systems, such as the hippocampus. The research reported here used handling and isolation alone, and in combination, and measured activity, cognitive ability and plasma CORT levels in adult rats. Handling resulted in increased activity, decreased CORT levels, and impaired spatial learning ability. Isolation failed to alter activity levels, impaired spatial ability, and increased CORT levels in females, and reduced them in males. Combining the two manipulations produced no changes in behavior or CORT levels. The results are discussed in terms of altering the manner in which the animals respond to environmental challenges.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Neurosciences.; Psychobiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nadel, Lynn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe effects of early experience on the hippocampus.en_US
dc.creatorWilson, Lynn Allison.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Lynn Allison.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSome experiences occurring early in life affect structure and function of the nervous system. Handling and isolation of infant rats produce physiological and behavioral changes that persist throughout life. These changes may result from interference with the maturation of late developing systems, such as the hippocampus. The research reported here used handling and isolation alone, and in combination, and measured activity, cognitive ability and plasma CORT levels in adult rats. Handling resulted in increased activity, decreased CORT levels, and impaired spatial learning ability. Isolation failed to alter activity levels, impaired spatial ability, and increased CORT levels in females, and reduced them in males. Combining the two manipulations produced no changes in behavior or CORT levels. The results are discussed in terms of altering the manner in which the animals respond to environmental challenges.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p, 47 missing from paper original.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences.en_US
dc.subjectPsychobiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNadel, Lynnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFigueredo, A.J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWenk, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408504en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720664578en_US
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