Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186407
Title:
Modeling biocolloid transport in saturated porous media.
Author:
Li, Shimin
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A forced-gradient experiment of virus and carboxylated microsphere transport was carried out at a two-well system in saturated aquifer at Borden, Ontario. The purpose of experiment was to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate bacteriophage transport relative to that of a conservative solute in porous media. A simplified plane radial advection dispersion equation coupled with reversible first-order and equilibrium mass transfer was found to be adequate to simulate the attachment and transport process. For simulating detachment and transport, all rate parameters were varied with time up/down (depending on the parameter) to reflect the changes in pH of groundwater with time from 7.4 to 8.4 then back to 7.4. Both constant and scale-dependent dispersivity were used in the modeling of the transport process. Time-moment analysis of the conservative-tracer breakthrough curves produced dispersivity values of 0.1-0.6 m, close to the macrodispersivity of 0.6 m obtained using a stochastic model to describe a previous larger-scale experiment at the site. The multiple-peak feature of all the breakthrough curves suggests that the aquifer heterogeneity may be more important than local dispersion in affecting the appearance of both electrical conductivity and phage breakthrough curves. Strack's model was found quite well to describe the hydraulic head profile during the whole period of experiment if proper values for transmissivity and cone radius are chosen. Virus traveled at least a few meters in the experiment, but virus concentrations at observation points 1-m to 2-m away were a small fraction of those injected. Though clearly not an equilibrium process, retardation involving a dynamic steady state between attachment and detachment is nevertheless a major determinant of transport versus retention of virus.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Hydrology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Bales, Roger C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleModeling biocolloid transport in saturated porous media.en_US
dc.creatorLi, Shiminen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Shiminen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA forced-gradient experiment of virus and carboxylated microsphere transport was carried out at a two-well system in saturated aquifer at Borden, Ontario. The purpose of experiment was to qualitatively and quantitatively investigate bacteriophage transport relative to that of a conservative solute in porous media. A simplified plane radial advection dispersion equation coupled with reversible first-order and equilibrium mass transfer was found to be adequate to simulate the attachment and transport process. For simulating detachment and transport, all rate parameters were varied with time up/down (depending on the parameter) to reflect the changes in pH of groundwater with time from 7.4 to 8.4 then back to 7.4. Both constant and scale-dependent dispersivity were used in the modeling of the transport process. Time-moment analysis of the conservative-tracer breakthrough curves produced dispersivity values of 0.1-0.6 m, close to the macrodispersivity of 0.6 m obtained using a stochastic model to describe a previous larger-scale experiment at the site. The multiple-peak feature of all the breakthrough curves suggests that the aquifer heterogeneity may be more important than local dispersion in affecting the appearance of both electrical conductivity and phage breakthrough curves. Strack's model was found quite well to describe the hydraulic head profile during the whole period of experiment if proper values for transmissivity and cone radius are chosen. Virus traveled at least a few meters in the experiment, but virus concentrations at observation points 1-m to 2-m away were a small fraction of those injected. Though clearly not an equilibrium process, retardation involving a dynamic steady state between attachment and detachment is nevertheless a major determinant of transport versus retention of virus.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBales, Roger C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConklin, Martha H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYeh, Jim T.-C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberContractor, Dinshaw N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArnold, Robert G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408482en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720429757en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.