The impact of school organization and transition on students' self-concept.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186394
Title:
The impact of school organization and transition on students' self-concept.
Author:
Ehmke, Norman Dean.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study evaluated the impact on the self-concept and self-assessed levels of anxiety of sixth grade students as they made the transition from elementary school to the middle school environment. In particular, the research focused upon the difference in the impact on students' self-concept and anxiety level as they transitioned from a departmentalized elementary instructional organization as compared to a self-contained elementary instructional organization. The research utilized a pre- post-test design. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale were administered in the sixth grade in schools in two separate, but similar, districts. The tests were administered in the fall of 1992 and the spring of 1993. The spring and fall data were interpreted and analyzed following the publisher's directions for scoring and interpreting the individual student responses. Comparisons of data for student self-concept and anxiety were made for each population and for gender and age between the two sample populations. The analysis of data as it pertains to the impact of school transition on student self-concept resulted in the following conclusions. (1) The instructional organization of sixth grade in the elementary school does not appear to have a significant impact on students' self-concept. (2) There is no significant difference in impact on self-concept between males and females. (3) There may be a more significant positive impact on the self-concept of 12 year old students than on 13 year old students. (4) The instructional organization of the sixth grade in the elementary school does not appear to have a significant impact on students' anxiety level. (5) The transition has a greater negative impact resulting in higher anxiety levels for 12 year old females than for 12 year old males, regardless of the instructional organization in the sixth grade. (6) There is no significant difference across age levels in the impact on anxiety levels between 12 year olds and 13 year olds regardless of the instructional organization in the sixth grade.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Administration and Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Nelson, Lawrence O.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe impact of school organization and transition on students' self-concept.en_US
dc.creatorEhmke, Norman Dean.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEhmke, Norman Dean.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study evaluated the impact on the self-concept and self-assessed levels of anxiety of sixth grade students as they made the transition from elementary school to the middle school environment. In particular, the research focused upon the difference in the impact on students' self-concept and anxiety level as they transitioned from a departmentalized elementary instructional organization as compared to a self-contained elementary instructional organization. The research utilized a pre- post-test design. The Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale and the Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale were administered in the sixth grade in schools in two separate, but similar, districts. The tests were administered in the fall of 1992 and the spring of 1993. The spring and fall data were interpreted and analyzed following the publisher's directions for scoring and interpreting the individual student responses. Comparisons of data for student self-concept and anxiety were made for each population and for gender and age between the two sample populations. The analysis of data as it pertains to the impact of school transition on student self-concept resulted in the following conclusions. (1) The instructional organization of sixth grade in the elementary school does not appear to have a significant impact on students' self-concept. (2) There is no significant difference in impact on self-concept between males and females. (3) There may be a more significant positive impact on the self-concept of 12 year old students than on 13 year old students. (4) The instructional organization of the sixth grade in the elementary school does not appear to have a significant impact on students' anxiety level. (5) The transition has a greater negative impact resulting in higher anxiety levels for 12 year old females than for 12 year old males, regardless of the instructional organization in the sixth grade. (6) There is no significant difference across age levels in the impact on anxiety levels between 12 year olds and 13 year olds regardless of the instructional organization in the sixth grade.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Administration and Higher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConley, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408470en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720065563en_US
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