Religio Augustini: Jordan of Quedlinburg and the Augustinian tradition in late medieval Germany.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186376
Title:
Religio Augustini: Jordan of Quedlinburg and the Augustinian tradition in late medieval Germany.
Author:
Saak, Eric Leland.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study focuses on the Expositio Orationis Dominicae of the little known Augustinian friar Jordan of Quedlinburg (d. 1370/80). An edition of this work is presented in Part One. Jordan's treatise originated from lectures he held in the Order's studium at Erfurt in 1327. As such, they offer insight into the 'other side' of the Augustinian School, the teaching in the studia not associated with a university. In the fourteenth century there were 32 studia generalia in which Augustinians could receive the prerequisite instruction for the 'degree' lector, the license to teach in any school of the Order except for those associated with a university. The theology of the other side of the Augustinian school was more representative of the Order's theology than were the Sentences commentaries of the Order's magistri. Furthermore, the office of lector was not merely a stage within the Order's educational system. The lectors were the legislators of the Order's doctrine. Jordan's theology was thoroughly Augustinian. This becomes apparent when his theology is placed in context of the religio Augustini. Jordan exhorted his brothers to be the imitators of Augustine and to follow Augustine's religion. Thus, they were not to remain cloistered in their cells, but were to bring the riches of the contemplative life to society at large by teaching and preaching. In this light, the religio Augustini offers the foundation for an historical interpretation of late medieval Augustinianism, rather than one based on theological definitions of the term Augustinian. For the late medieval Augustinian Hermit, it was the religio Augustini that made one an Augustinian.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Middle ages.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Oberman, Heiko A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleReligio Augustini: Jordan of Quedlinburg and the Augustinian tradition in late medieval Germany.en_US
dc.creatorSaak, Eric Leland.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSaak, Eric Leland.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study focuses on the Expositio Orationis Dominicae of the little known Augustinian friar Jordan of Quedlinburg (d. 1370/80). An edition of this work is presented in Part One. Jordan's treatise originated from lectures he held in the Order's studium at Erfurt in 1327. As such, they offer insight into the 'other side' of the Augustinian School, the teaching in the studia not associated with a university. In the fourteenth century there were 32 studia generalia in which Augustinians could receive the prerequisite instruction for the 'degree' lector, the license to teach in any school of the Order except for those associated with a university. The theology of the other side of the Augustinian school was more representative of the Order's theology than were the Sentences commentaries of the Order's magistri. Furthermore, the office of lector was not merely a stage within the Order's educational system. The lectors were the legislators of the Order's doctrine. Jordan's theology was thoroughly Augustinian. This becomes apparent when his theology is placed in context of the religio Augustini. Jordan exhorted his brothers to be the imitators of Augustine and to follow Augustine's religion. Thus, they were not to remain cloistered in their cells, but were to bring the riches of the contemplative life to society at large by teaching and preaching. In this light, the religio Augustini offers the foundation for an historical interpretation of late medieval Augustinianism, rather than one based on theological definitions of the term Augustinian. For the late medieval Augustinian Hermit, it was the religio Augustini that made one an Augustinian.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMiddle ages.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOberman, Heiko A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Alan E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinstein, Donalden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408408en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702393448en_US
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