Honor your fathers: The emergence of a patriarchal ideology in early modern Germany.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186373
Title:
Honor your fathers: The emergence of a patriarchal ideology in early modern Germany.
Author:
Bast, Robert James.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
How did the domestic, ecclesiological and political treatises of the early modern era come to be dominated by the language of paternal authority? Hitherto scholars have attributed this phenomenon to Protestantism, characterized by married clerics dependent on the protection of governing powers. That view is challenged by a broad survey of catechetical literature, sermons, and government ordinances in Germany from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries. Already in the thirteenth century, clerics were showing new interest in defining standards of conduct for the laity through the Ten Commandments. A narrow reading of the fourth commandment--Honor your Father and your Mother--came to serve as the rubric under which reformers in each subsequent age and all major confessions worked to shore up the authority of male leadership in the household, the Church, and the body politic. Priests and preachers promoted this program as an antidote to the turmoil caused by the plagues, war, rebellions and movements of reform that mark the end of feudal Europe. Though the program left its traces on each institution it was intended to shape, in the latter half of the sixteenth century it scored its most spectacular success: Protestant and Catholic rulers made the model of the disciplining father their own.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Paternalism -- Germany.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Oberman, Heiko A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHonor your fathers: The emergence of a patriarchal ideology in early modern Germany.en_US
dc.creatorBast, Robert James.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBast, Robert James.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHow did the domestic, ecclesiological and political treatises of the early modern era come to be dominated by the language of paternal authority? Hitherto scholars have attributed this phenomenon to Protestantism, characterized by married clerics dependent on the protection of governing powers. That view is challenged by a broad survey of catechetical literature, sermons, and government ordinances in Germany from the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries. Already in the thirteenth century, clerics were showing new interest in defining standards of conduct for the laity through the Ten Commandments. A narrow reading of the fourth commandment--Honor your Father and your Mother--came to serve as the rubric under which reformers in each subsequent age and all major confessions worked to shore up the authority of male leadership in the household, the Church, and the body politic. Priests and preachers promoted this program as an antidote to the turmoil caused by the plagues, war, rebellions and movements of reform that mark the end of feudal Europe. Though the program left its traces on each institution it was intended to shape, in the latter half of the sixteenth century it scored its most spectacular success: Protestant and Catholic rulers made the model of the disciplining father their own.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPaternalism -- Germany.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOberman, Heiko A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Alanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinstein, Donalden_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408404en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702387367en_US
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