FT-SR: A programming language for constructing fault-tolerant distributed systems.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186367
Title:
FT-SR: A programming language for constructing fault-tolerant distributed systems.
Author:
Thomas, Vicraj Timothy
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation focuses on the area of improving programming language support for constructing fault-tolerant systems. Specifically, the design and implementation of FT-SR, a programming language developed for building a wide variety of fault-tolerant systems, is described. FT-SR is based on the concurrent programming language SR and is designed as a set of extensions to SR. A distinguishing feature of FT-SR is the flexibility it provides the programmer in structuring fault-tolerant software. It is flexible enough to be used for structuring systems according to any of the standard fault-tolerance structuring paradigms that have been developed for such systems, including the object/action model, the restartable action paradigm, and the state machine approach. This is especially important in systems building because different structuring paradigms are often appropriate for different parts of the system. This flexibility sets FT-SR apart from other fault-tolerant programming languages which provide language support for the one paradigm that is best suited for the class of applications they choose to support. FT-SR, on the other hand, is suitable for programming a variety of systems and applications. FT-SR derives its flexibility from a programming model based on fail-stop atomic objects. These objects execute operations as atomic actions except when a failure or series of failures cause underlying implementation assumptions to be violated; in this case, notification is provided. This dissertation argues that fail-stop atomic objects are the fundamental building blocks for all fault-tolerant programs. FT-SR provides the programmer with simple fail-stop atomic objects, and mechanisms that allow these fail-stop atomic objects to be composed to form higher-level fail-stop atomic objects that can tolerate a greater number of faults. The mechanisms for composing fail-stop atomic objects are based on standard redundancy techniques. This ability to combine the basic building blocks in a variety of ways allows programmers to structure their programs in a manner best suited to the application at hand. FT-SR has been implemented using version 3.1 of the x-kernel and runs standalone on Sun 3s. The implementation is interesting because of the novel algorithms and optimizations used within the language runtime system.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Computer science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Computer Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Schlichting, Richard

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFT-SR: A programming language for constructing fault-tolerant distributed systems.en_US
dc.creatorThomas, Vicraj Timothyen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Vicraj Timothyen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on the area of improving programming language support for constructing fault-tolerant systems. Specifically, the design and implementation of FT-SR, a programming language developed for building a wide variety of fault-tolerant systems, is described. FT-SR is based on the concurrent programming language SR and is designed as a set of extensions to SR. A distinguishing feature of FT-SR is the flexibility it provides the programmer in structuring fault-tolerant software. It is flexible enough to be used for structuring systems according to any of the standard fault-tolerance structuring paradigms that have been developed for such systems, including the object/action model, the restartable action paradigm, and the state machine approach. This is especially important in systems building because different structuring paradigms are often appropriate for different parts of the system. This flexibility sets FT-SR apart from other fault-tolerant programming languages which provide language support for the one paradigm that is best suited for the class of applications they choose to support. FT-SR, on the other hand, is suitable for programming a variety of systems and applications. FT-SR derives its flexibility from a programming model based on fail-stop atomic objects. These objects execute operations as atomic actions except when a failure or series of failures cause underlying implementation assumptions to be violated; in this case, notification is provided. This dissertation argues that fail-stop atomic objects are the fundamental building blocks for all fault-tolerant programs. FT-SR provides the programmer with simple fail-stop atomic objects, and mechanisms that allow these fail-stop atomic objects to be composed to form higher-level fail-stop atomic objects that can tolerate a greater number of faults. The mechanisms for composing fail-stop atomic objects are based on standard redundancy techniques. This ability to combine the basic building blocks in a variety of ways allows programmers to structure their programs in a manner best suited to the application at hand. FT-SR has been implemented using version 3.1 of the x-kernel and runs standalone on Sun 3s. The implementation is interesting because of the novel algorithms and optimizations used within the language runtime system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectComputer science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchlichting, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAndrews, Gregory R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, Larryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408399en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720401468en_US
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