Dual relationships: A national study of addiction counselors' beliefs and behaviors.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186345
Title:
Dual relationships: A national study of addiction counselors' beliefs and behaviors.
Author:
St. Germaine, Jacquelyn
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study of ethical beliefs and behaviors of mental health professionals has become important of late. Of particular relevance is the "dual relationship", a second relationship that occurs between counselor and client. Addiction counselors, many of whom are recovering alcoholics/addicts, are often placed in situations, such as 12-step meetings and recovery groups, that could result in dual relationships. A national survey of 2000 Certified Addiction Counselors was conducted to determine their ethical beliefs and practices in the area of dual relationships. The results were compared to the Borys and Pope (1989) national study of psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers. The majority of counselors rated 11 behaviors as "never ethical" and had never engaged in 19 of the 20 behaviors, a more conservative report than the subjects of the Borys and Pope (1989) study. No significant differences were found in reported practice of 13 behaviors between the two studies. Addiction counselors reported higher rates of practice on four items and lower rates of practice on three items than the Borys and Pope subjects. Respondents report the same rate of engaging in sexual dual relationships with current clients as the other group (.5%). While over half of counselors were recovering alcoholics/addicts, this variable had no effect on ethical beliefs or behaviors.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Clinical psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mishra, Shitala P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDual relationships: A national study of addiction counselors' beliefs and behaviors.en_US
dc.creatorSt. Germaine, Jacquelynen_US
dc.contributor.authorSt. Germaine, Jacquelynen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study of ethical beliefs and behaviors of mental health professionals has become important of late. Of particular relevance is the "dual relationship", a second relationship that occurs between counselor and client. Addiction counselors, many of whom are recovering alcoholics/addicts, are often placed in situations, such as 12-step meetings and recovery groups, that could result in dual relationships. A national survey of 2000 Certified Addiction Counselors was conducted to determine their ethical beliefs and practices in the area of dual relationships. The results were compared to the Borys and Pope (1989) national study of psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers. The majority of counselors rated 11 behaviors as "never ethical" and had never engaged in 19 of the 20 behaviors, a more conservative report than the subjects of the Borys and Pope (1989) study. No significant differences were found in reported practice of 13 behaviors between the two studies. Addiction counselors reported higher rates of practice on four items and lower rates of practice on three items than the Borys and Pope subjects. Respondents report the same rate of engaging in sexual dual relationships with current clients as the other group (.5%). While over half of counselors were recovering alcoholics/addicts, this variable had no effect on ethical beliefs or behaviors.en_US
dc.description.noteDigitization note: p. 36 missing in paper and microfilm copies.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectClinical psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLauver, Philipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9408380en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720055562en_US
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