Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186319
Title:
Structure and morphology development in CVD diamond.
Author:
Craigie, Cameron James Dasilva.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The development of vapor deposited diamond for optical, electronic, and protective applications has been hindered by non-diamond carbon contamination, by our present inability to grow a thick, single crystal diamond film, and by our lack of understanding of how the various aspects of chemical vapor deposition interact. Our lack of understanding in this area leaves gaps in our ability to predict how microstructure on this, and many other film surfaces will develop. This dissertation reviews the factors that affect crystal growth rates and the development of microstructure. It also reviews the existing models of microstructure development with an eye toward the development of one that plays a general predictive role in the deposition of covalently bonded solids and in reactive deposition systems. The conclusions drawn point to a model which predicts where boundaries will lie on a morphology map using deposition parameters, such as temperature and pressure, as coordinates. Such a map will depend not only on the material being deposited, but also on the reaction path leading to deposition. Some deposition parameters will always dominate over others. Efforts are made to isolate some of the dominant processes, under a limited set of deposition conditions, for combustion deposited diamond. Previously published data on oriented polycrystalline growth is reconsidered with an eye on the same concerns, particularly around the observed transition between <110> and <100> orientations. Additional experiments in this vein are proposed. The existence of a metastable amorphous state is also proposed and considered. The dependence of amorphicity on bond angle variation makes possible superheated crystals that maintain their crystalline coordination amorphous. However, properties necessary to stabilize this state, high thermal transfer rates and a strongly periodic structure, are opposed to the soft bonding needed to make this state more probable. The state is, effectively, unobservable in silicon, and hence in diamond as well.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Materials science.; Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Macleod, H. Angus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleStructure and morphology development in CVD diamond.en_US
dc.creatorCraigie, Cameron James Dasilva.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCraigie, Cameron James Dasilva.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe development of vapor deposited diamond for optical, electronic, and protective applications has been hindered by non-diamond carbon contamination, by our present inability to grow a thick, single crystal diamond film, and by our lack of understanding of how the various aspects of chemical vapor deposition interact. Our lack of understanding in this area leaves gaps in our ability to predict how microstructure on this, and many other film surfaces will develop. This dissertation reviews the factors that affect crystal growth rates and the development of microstructure. It also reviews the existing models of microstructure development with an eye toward the development of one that plays a general predictive role in the deposition of covalently bonded solids and in reactive deposition systems. The conclusions drawn point to a model which predicts where boundaries will lie on a morphology map using deposition parameters, such as temperature and pressure, as coordinates. Such a map will depend not only on the material being deposited, but also on the reaction path leading to deposition. Some deposition parameters will always dominate over others. Efforts are made to isolate some of the dominant processes, under a limited set of deposition conditions, for combustion deposited diamond. Previously published data on oriented polycrystalline growth is reconsidered with an eye on the same concerns, particularly around the observed transition between <110> and <100> orientations. Additional experiments in this vein are proposed. The existence of a metastable amorphous state is also proposed and considered. The dependence of amorphicity on bond angle variation makes possible superheated crystals that maintain their crystalline coordination amorphous. However, properties necessary to stabilize this state, high thermal transfer rates and a strongly periodic structure, are opposed to the soft bonding needed to make this state more probable. The state is, effectively, unobservable in silicon, and hence in diamond as well.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectMaterials science.en_US
dc.subjectOptics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMacleod, H. Angusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDeymier, Pierre A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobson, Michael R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFeldmann, Kennethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9333324en_US
dc.identifier.oclc720026399en_US
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