A linguistic investigation of the relationship between physiology and handshape.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186302
Title:
A linguistic investigation of the relationship between physiology and handshape.
Author:
Ann, Jean
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
There are two main hypotheses examined in the dissertation. The first is that the physiology of the hand provides motivation for the claim that sign language handshapes can be considered easy, hard or even impossible to articulate. The second hypothesis is that easy handshapes occur more often than expected, hard handshapes occur less often than expected and impossible handshapes don't occur at all within a single sign language. These hypotheses are examined in the following ways: first, I provide a detailed explanation of the physiology of the hand from which I conclude that not all fingers are equal in skill and not all configurations a hand may assume are equally easy. Second, based on the physiology, I propose a metric for determining which handshapes are "easy" and which are "difficult". Third, I examine whether the "easy" handshapes occur more often than expected, while the "hard" handshapes occur less often than expected in the signs of two languages, American Sign Language (ASL) and Taiwan Sign Language (TSL). I conclude that the hypothesis that the "easy" handshapes occur more often than expected and the "hard" handshapes occur less often than expected is supported in approximately half of the cases.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sign language -- Research.; Hand -- Research.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Linguistics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Hammond, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA linguistic investigation of the relationship between physiology and handshape.en_US
dc.creatorAnn, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnn, Jeanen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThere are two main hypotheses examined in the dissertation. The first is that the physiology of the hand provides motivation for the claim that sign language handshapes can be considered easy, hard or even impossible to articulate. The second hypothesis is that easy handshapes occur more often than expected, hard handshapes occur less often than expected and impossible handshapes don't occur at all within a single sign language. These hypotheses are examined in the following ways: first, I provide a detailed explanation of the physiology of the hand from which I conclude that not all fingers are equal in skill and not all configurations a hand may assume are equally easy. Second, based on the physiology, I propose a metric for determining which handshapes are "easy" and which are "difficult". Third, I examine whether the "easy" handshapes occur more often than expected, while the "hard" handshapes occur less often than expected in the signs of two languages, American Sign Language (ASL) and Taiwan Sign Language (TSL). I conclude that the hypothesis that the "easy" handshapes occur more often than expected and the "hard" handshapes occur less often than expected is supported in approximately half of the cases.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSign language -- Research.en_US
dc.subjectHand -- Research.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLinguisticsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHammond, Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArchangeli, Diana B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSupalla, Samen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9333309en_US
dc.identifier.oclc704420410en_US
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