Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186297
Title:
Preconceptions of elementary and secondary preservice teachers.
Author:
Kile, Robert Steven.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to explore the preconceptions of classroom teaching held by the preservice teacher education students participating in the study. Further, the preconceptions of students majoring in elementary education were compared and contrasted with students majoring in secondary education for similarities and differences in their preconceptions of classroom teaching. Lastly, the participants were further divided into subgroups of traditional and nontraditional students. The similarities and differences of those subgroups' preconceptions were also examined. The participants included twenty-two students in a required first semester teacher education course. The course content encompassed material that was non-grade level specific or teaching content specific. Qualitative data was collected through the students' written assignments, audio- and videotapes of class and teaching lab sessions, small group discussions, fieldnotes, and informal interviews. Analysis of the data was conducted using Glasser's (1967) constant comparative method. The study found both similarities and differences across the participants' subgroupings of elementary and secondary majors, as well as the subgroupings of traditional and nontraditional students. The study found that the participants held preconceptions of classroom teaching and that those views are used as orienting lenses toward their teacher education coursework and fieldwork experiences. The findings of this study indicate that preservice teacher education students' preconceptions examined at the beginning of their formal coursework may be a research strand worth pursuing in furthering our understandings of teacher education students' orientations to teaching. The study's final chapter offers suggestions for future teacher education research and teach education practices.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Teachers -- Training of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Teaching and Teacher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Griffin, Gary A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePreconceptions of elementary and secondary preservice teachers.en_US
dc.creatorKile, Robert Steven.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKile, Robert Steven.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to explore the preconceptions of classroom teaching held by the preservice teacher education students participating in the study. Further, the preconceptions of students majoring in elementary education were compared and contrasted with students majoring in secondary education for similarities and differences in their preconceptions of classroom teaching. Lastly, the participants were further divided into subgroups of traditional and nontraditional students. The similarities and differences of those subgroups' preconceptions were also examined. The participants included twenty-two students in a required first semester teacher education course. The course content encompassed material that was non-grade level specific or teaching content specific. Qualitative data was collected through the students' written assignments, audio- and videotapes of class and teaching lab sessions, small group discussions, fieldnotes, and informal interviews. Analysis of the data was conducted using Glasser's (1967) constant comparative method. The study found both similarities and differences across the participants' subgroupings of elementary and secondary majors, as well as the subgroupings of traditional and nontraditional students. The study found that the participants held preconceptions of classroom teaching and that those views are used as orienting lenses toward their teacher education coursework and fieldwork experiences. The findings of this study indicate that preservice teacher education students' preconceptions examined at the beginning of their formal coursework may be a research strand worth pursuing in furthering our understandings of teacher education students' orientations to teaching. The study's final chapter offers suggestions for future teacher education research and teach education practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching and Teacher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGriffin, Gary A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRichardson, Virginiaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKirby, Danen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9333304en_US
dc.identifier.oclc717514588en_US
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