Preattentive processing: The effects of unattended information on consideration sets.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186285
Title:
Preattentive processing: The effects of unattended information on consideration sets.
Author:
Shapiro, Stewart Alan.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Given that many print advertisements may not be processed in focal attention, the effects of processing unattended advertisements are of significant importance to marketers. Unattended advertisements refer to advertisements which are preattentively processed but which do not subsequently gain access to attentional resources. While previous research examining unattended processing provides important evidence for an increase in attitude independent of conscious recognition, further investigation is needed to determine whether unattended stimuli affect other measures of advertising effectiveness. This dissertation examines the extent to which preattentively processing an unattended advertisement increases the likelihood that the advertised product is included within a consumer's consideration set. Additionally, this effect is examined to determine if the effect of this type of processing is dependent upon (1) whether the advertised product is depicted pictorially versus verbally, (2) whether the buying situation is familiar, and (3) whether product alternatives are or are not externally available during the choice decision. Further, this dissertation utilizes a more rigorous methodology than has been used in previous research examining unattended processing. Two studies have been conducted to address the issues cited above. Study 1 is designed to provide independent evidence of unattended processing. This study utilizes a 2 x 2 fully crossed between subjects factorial design with 2 modality conditions (verbal/pictorial) and 2 target products (desk/carrot). Study 2 is designed to examine the effects of unattended processing on the consideration set measures. This study utilizes a 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 mixed factorial design with 2 modality conditions (verbal/pictorial), 2 buying situations (ad hoc/established) and 2 target products (desk/carrot) as the between subjects factors and 2 buying conditions (memory-based/stimulus-based) as the within subject factor. Results are relatively inconclusive, but provide clear directions for future research. In terms of Study 1, it is believed that the specific measures used to provide independent evidence for unattended processing were not valid. Mixed results were found in the most ideal conditions in Study 2. The computerized methodology proposed in this study appears to have some merit, however additional research is needed to more accurately determine the validity of this methodology.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Marketing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
MacInnis, Deborah J.; Heckler, Susan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePreattentive processing: The effects of unattended information on consideration sets.en_US
dc.creatorShapiro, Stewart Alan.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShapiro, Stewart Alan.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGiven that many print advertisements may not be processed in focal attention, the effects of processing unattended advertisements are of significant importance to marketers. Unattended advertisements refer to advertisements which are preattentively processed but which do not subsequently gain access to attentional resources. While previous research examining unattended processing provides important evidence for an increase in attitude independent of conscious recognition, further investigation is needed to determine whether unattended stimuli affect other measures of advertising effectiveness. This dissertation examines the extent to which preattentively processing an unattended advertisement increases the likelihood that the advertised product is included within a consumer's consideration set. Additionally, this effect is examined to determine if the effect of this type of processing is dependent upon (1) whether the advertised product is depicted pictorially versus verbally, (2) whether the buying situation is familiar, and (3) whether product alternatives are or are not externally available during the choice decision. Further, this dissertation utilizes a more rigorous methodology than has been used in previous research examining unattended processing. Two studies have been conducted to address the issues cited above. Study 1 is designed to provide independent evidence of unattended processing. This study utilizes a 2 x 2 fully crossed between subjects factorial design with 2 modality conditions (verbal/pictorial) and 2 target products (desk/carrot). Study 2 is designed to examine the effects of unattended processing on the consideration set measures. This study utilizes a 2 x 2 x 2 x 2 mixed factorial design with 2 modality conditions (verbal/pictorial), 2 buying situations (ad hoc/established) and 2 target products (desk/carrot) as the between subjects factors and 2 buying conditions (memory-based/stimulus-based) as the within subject factor. Results are relatively inconclusive, but provide clear directions for future research. In terms of Study 1, it is believed that the specific measures used to provide independent evidence for unattended processing were not valid. Mixed results were found in the most ideal conditions in Study 2. The computerized methodology proposed in this study appears to have some merit, however additional research is needed to more accurately determine the validity of this methodology.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectMarketing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMacInnis, Deborah J.en_US
dc.contributor.chairHeckler, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrucks, Merrieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPeterson, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9328615en_US
dc.identifier.oclc717485853en_US
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