The Red Jews: Apocalypticism and antisemitism in medieval and early modern Germany.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186270
Title:
The Red Jews: Apocalypticism and antisemitism in medieval and early modern Germany.
Author:
Gow, Andrew Colin.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Red Jews are a legendary people; this is their history. From the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth century, vernacular German texts depicted the Red Jews, a conflation of the Biblical ten lost tribes of Israel and Gog and Magog, as a savage and unnaturally foul nation, who are enclosed in the 'Caspian Mountains', where they had been walled up by Alexander the Great. At the end of time, they will break out and serve the Antichrist, causing great destruction and suffering in the world. The hostile identification (c. 1165) of Jews with the apocalyptic destroyers of Ezekiel 38-39 and Revelation 20 expresses a new and virulent antisemitism that was integrated into the powerful apocalyptic traditions of Christianity. None of the few scholars who have noticed the Red Jews in medieval and early modern vernacular texts has sought out, collected and examined the complete body of medieval and early-modern sources that feature the Red Jews. This study provides a long-term analysis of the intimate connections between antisemitism and apocalypticism via a forgotten and submerged piece of German 'medievalia', the Red Jews. The legend gradually dissipated. Until the beginning of the seventeenth century it was a medieval lens through which Germans saw events relating to the Turkish threat in the East; after that time, the Red Jews disappeared from European texts.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Christianity and antisemitism -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.; Christianity and antisemitism -- History -- 16th century; Jews -- Germany -- Social conditions -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.; Apocalyptic literature -- History and criticism.; Antisemitism -- Germany -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.; Antisemitism -- Germany -- History -- 16th century.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
History; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Oberman, Heiko A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe Red Jews: Apocalypticism and antisemitism in medieval and early modern Germany.en_US
dc.creatorGow, Andrew Colin.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGow, Andrew Colin.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Red Jews are a legendary people; this is their history. From the late thirteenth to the late sixteenth century, vernacular German texts depicted the Red Jews, a conflation of the Biblical ten lost tribes of Israel and Gog and Magog, as a savage and unnaturally foul nation, who are enclosed in the 'Caspian Mountains', where they had been walled up by Alexander the Great. At the end of time, they will break out and serve the Antichrist, causing great destruction and suffering in the world. The hostile identification (c. 1165) of Jews with the apocalyptic destroyers of Ezekiel 38-39 and Revelation 20 expresses a new and virulent antisemitism that was integrated into the powerful apocalyptic traditions of Christianity. None of the few scholars who have noticed the Red Jews in medieval and early modern vernacular texts has sought out, collected and examined the complete body of medieval and early-modern sources that feature the Red Jews. This study provides a long-term analysis of the intimate connections between antisemitism and apocalypticism via a forgotten and submerged piece of German 'medievalia', the Red Jews. The legend gradually dissipated. Until the beginning of the seventeenth century it was a medieval lens through which Germans saw events relating to the Turkish threat in the East; after that time, the Red Jews disappeared from European texts.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChristianity and antisemitism -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.en_US
dc.subjectChristianity and antisemitism -- History -- 16th centuryen_US
dc.subjectJews -- Germany -- Social conditions -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.en_US
dc.subjectApocalyptic literature -- History and criticism.en_US
dc.subjectAntisemitism -- Germany -- History -- Middle Ages, 600-1500.en_US
dc.subjectAntisemitism -- Germany -- History -- 16th century.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOberman, Heiko A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWeinstein, Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBernstein, Alanen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9328574en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702381417en_US
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