Children's self-evaluations and attributions in achievement settings.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186267
Title:
Children's self-evaluations and attributions in achievement settings.
Author:
Winsky, Denise Lynn.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The effects of task structure and task outcome on the self-evaluations children make were examined in the study. One hundred forty seven students in second, fourth, sixth, and eighth grades were surveyed following successful and unsuccessful outcomes in a classroom achievement setting. Students were randomly divided into two task structure groups: individual, competitive task structure, and cooperative learning groups. The students worked under these differing task structures on a reading comprehension activity. Half the students in each group and each grade were told they had done well on the comprehension exercise and half were told they had done poorly, then all were surveyed. Students who were told they had succeeded made higher self-evaluations than did students who were told they had failed. At all grade levels, and in both task structure groups, students were much happier with themselves and their work if they were told they had done well, than if they believed that had done poorly. Students who believed they had succeeded made more attributions to the internal attributions of ability and effort than did those who thought they had failed at the task. Younger students attributed outcome more to effort than did older students and students working under the cooperative learning task structure attributed outcome more to ability and task difficulty than did students working in competitive groups. These results found in a naturalistic classroom environment contribute to previous findings from attribution research in laboratory settings.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Educational psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Obrzut, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleChildren's self-evaluations and attributions in achievement settings.en_US
dc.creatorWinsky, Denise Lynn.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWinsky, Denise Lynn.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe effects of task structure and task outcome on the self-evaluations children make were examined in the study. One hundred forty seven students in second, fourth, sixth, and eighth grades were surveyed following successful and unsuccessful outcomes in a classroom achievement setting. Students were randomly divided into two task structure groups: individual, competitive task structure, and cooperative learning groups. The students worked under these differing task structures on a reading comprehension activity. Half the students in each group and each grade were told they had done well on the comprehension exercise and half were told they had done poorly, then all were surveyed. Students who were told they had succeeded made higher self-evaluations than did students who were told they had failed. At all grade levels, and in both task structure groups, students were much happier with themselves and their work if they were told they had done well, than if they believed that had done poorly. Students who believed they had succeeded made more attributions to the internal attributions of ability and effort than did those who thought they had failed at the task. Younger students attributed outcome more to effort than did older students and students working under the cooperative learning task structure attributed outcome more to ability and task difficulty than did students working in competitive groups. These results found in a naturalistic classroom environment contribute to previous findings from attribution research in laboratory settings.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectEducational psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairObrzut, Johnen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Kenneth J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMishra, Shitala P.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9328571en_US
dc.identifier.oclc717428447en_US
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