Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186258
Title:
Light scattering from binary optics.
Author:
Ricks, Douglas Wayne.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Binary optics is a new technology that makes use of the principle of diffraction instead of reflection or refraction to change an incident wavefront. This technology takes advantage of the recent progress in microlithography. There are many new and exciting applications for binary optics, and we can also expect to see the replacement of some conventional optical elements with binary optics. In many ways a binary optic behaves like a diffraction grating with a period that changes continually over the surface of the optic. We find that energy is scattered into different diffraction orders, and there is scattering similar to "grass", "ghosts", "errors of run", "accidental errors of amplitude", and diffuse scattering from surface roughness, just like there is from a diffraction grating. There are vector theories and scalar theories of diffraction. In this dissertation we give the conditions under which the various theories are applicable. We derive a formula for scattering from binary optics with slightly rough surfaces. By comparing this theory to computer simulations of scattering from binary optics we show that the theory can account for random fabrication errors. Formulas are also derived to predict the scattering from systematic errors. The author designed and built an instrument to measure scattering at small angles, and we show that measured scattering from binary optics can be predicted by the theories developed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Optics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Macleod, Angus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLight scattering from binary optics.en_US
dc.creatorRicks, Douglas Wayne.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRicks, Douglas Wayne.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBinary optics is a new technology that makes use of the principle of diffraction instead of reflection or refraction to change an incident wavefront. This technology takes advantage of the recent progress in microlithography. There are many new and exciting applications for binary optics, and we can also expect to see the replacement of some conventional optical elements with binary optics. In many ways a binary optic behaves like a diffraction grating with a period that changes continually over the surface of the optic. We find that energy is scattered into different diffraction orders, and there is scattering similar to "grass", "ghosts", "errors of run", "accidental errors of amplitude", and diffuse scattering from surface roughness, just like there is from a diffraction grating. There are vector theories and scalar theories of diffraction. In this dissertation we give the conditions under which the various theories are applicable. We derive a formula for scattering from binary optics with slightly rough surfaces. By comparing this theory to computer simulations of scattering from binary optics we show that the theory can account for random fabrication errors. Formulas are also derived to predict the scattering from systematic errors. The author designed and built an instrument to measure scattering at small angles, and we show that measured scattering from binary optics can be predicted by the theories developed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectOptics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMacleod, Angusen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMilster, Tomen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberShannon, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest9328563en_US
dc.identifier.oclc717514203en_US
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