Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186249
Title:
ABERRATIONS OF UNOBSCURED REFLECTIVE OPTICAL SYSTEMS.
Author:
ROGERS, JOHN RICE.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The primary distinction between an ordinary optical system and one which is both unobscured and reflective is that the elements of the latter must be tilted or decentered with respect to one another. In general, this results in an optical system which has no axis of rotational symmetry, and therefore the classical aberration theory of symmetric systems is no longer applicable. Furthermore, the image becomes anamorphic and keystone distorted, due to the relative tilt between the object and the optical surfaces. The first part of this work is the development of a semi-analytic treatment of the properties (through third order) of systems possessing large tilts and decentrations. The Gaussian properties of both the image and pupil are described in terms of tilt, decentration, magnification, keystone distortion, and anamorphic distortion parameters. In computing these parameters, it is important to take into account the transferred components of the parameters, which are due to the Gaussian properties of the preceding surfaces. The third order properties are computed using the fact that each optical surface, together with its associated entrance pupil, form an optical subsystem which possesses an axis of approximate symmetry. About this axis, the aberration contributions of that surface may be described in the classical wave aberration expansion. The coefficients in this expansion may be corrected for the non-circular appearance of both the object and pupil, using the parametric description of their Gaussian form. the aberration fields due to the various surface contributions are then combined vectorally to yield the resultant aberration field in the image plane. The vector theory is applied to the analysis of several optical systems, and the accuracy of the theory verified by comparison with raytrace data. As a demonstration of the usefulness of the theory to an optical designer, a three mirror unobscured system was designed using a methodology derived from the theory. At each step, the design options are explained, and the probable results are discussed. The residual aberrations of the resulting system are studied, and the selection of another design starting point is discussed from the point of view of the theory.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Aberration.; Optical instruments -- Design and construction.; Imaging systems.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Optical Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Shannon, Robert R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleABERRATIONS OF UNOBSCURED REFLECTIVE OPTICAL SYSTEMS.en_US
dc.creatorROGERS, JOHN RICE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorROGERS, JOHN RICE.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary distinction between an ordinary optical system and one which is both unobscured and reflective is that the elements of the latter must be tilted or decentered with respect to one another. In general, this results in an optical system which has no axis of rotational symmetry, and therefore the classical aberration theory of symmetric systems is no longer applicable. Furthermore, the image becomes anamorphic and keystone distorted, due to the relative tilt between the object and the optical surfaces. The first part of this work is the development of a semi-analytic treatment of the properties (through third order) of systems possessing large tilts and decentrations. The Gaussian properties of both the image and pupil are described in terms of tilt, decentration, magnification, keystone distortion, and anamorphic distortion parameters. In computing these parameters, it is important to take into account the transferred components of the parameters, which are due to the Gaussian properties of the preceding surfaces. The third order properties are computed using the fact that each optical surface, together with its associated entrance pupil, form an optical subsystem which possesses an axis of approximate symmetry. About this axis, the aberration contributions of that surface may be described in the classical wave aberration expansion. The coefficients in this expansion may be corrected for the non-circular appearance of both the object and pupil, using the parametric description of their Gaussian form. the aberration fields due to the various surface contributions are then combined vectorally to yield the resultant aberration field in the image plane. The vector theory is applied to the analysis of several optical systems, and the accuracy of the theory verified by comparison with raytrace data. As a demonstration of the usefulness of the theory to an optical designer, a three mirror unobscured system was designed using a methodology derived from the theory. At each step, the design options are explained, and the probable results are discussed. The residual aberrations of the resulting system are studied, and the selection of another design starting point is discussed from the point of view of the theory.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAberration.en_US
dc.subjectOptical instruments -- Design and construction.en_US
dc.subjectImaging systems.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShannon, Robert R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8315303en_US
dc.identifier.oclc689054063en_US
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