Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186226
Title:
EFFECTS OF TEACHING COPING SKILLS TO WIDOWS IN GROUPS.
Author:
RAY, ROBERT WILLARD.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Are widows, in the time of bereavement, able to learn coping skills through a model for group interaction? Sixty-two widows from 4 United Methodist congregations were randomly assigned to experimental and comparison conditions at each location, with experimental and comparison groups being formed of 10, 5, 9, and 7 each. Fifty-five completed the program, 10, 5, 7, and 7 in experimental, 9, 4, 9, and 4 in comparison. They were studied to determine change brought about by 16 hours of treatment over 4 weeks, 2 hours offered twice weekly. Treatment had 3 foci: separation from the deceased, resolution of personal loss, and renewed social interest and relationship. Group exercises were offered to encourage interaction. A handbook for the 16 hour program is found in the Appendix. Change was measured by two questionnaires, the author's Personal Assessment Questionnaire designed to measure adjustment of widows, and the Institute for Personality and Ability Testing Depression Scale, Personal Assessment Inventory, a measure of depression. Both instruments were administered as pretests and post-tests. A mixed analysis of variance with hierarchical design using a three-factor approach was conducted. The P. A. I. failed to register significant change in level of depression. The Personal Assessment Questionnaire registered change at the .0088 probability level, indicating the overall significance of the group treatment approach. The second independent variable, the subgroups generated at different locations, was found to be of insignificant effect upon the treatment variable. Informal comments by group members and observers suggest that this program of treatment for widows was of value to participants and could be helpful in other groups within church or similar settings. The program developed by Ray, a United Methodist minister, is being employed in churches of the Pacific and Southwest Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Widows -- United States.; Bereavement -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christiansen, Harley D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF TEACHING COPING SKILLS TO WIDOWS IN GROUPS.en_US
dc.creatorRAY, ROBERT WILLARD.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRAY, ROBERT WILLARD.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAre widows, in the time of bereavement, able to learn coping skills through a model for group interaction? Sixty-two widows from 4 United Methodist congregations were randomly assigned to experimental and comparison conditions at each location, with experimental and comparison groups being formed of 10, 5, 9, and 7 each. Fifty-five completed the program, 10, 5, 7, and 7 in experimental, 9, 4, 9, and 4 in comparison. They were studied to determine change brought about by 16 hours of treatment over 4 weeks, 2 hours offered twice weekly. Treatment had 3 foci: separation from the deceased, resolution of personal loss, and renewed social interest and relationship. Group exercises were offered to encourage interaction. A handbook for the 16 hour program is found in the Appendix. Change was measured by two questionnaires, the author's Personal Assessment Questionnaire designed to measure adjustment of widows, and the Institute for Personality and Ability Testing Depression Scale, Personal Assessment Inventory, a measure of depression. Both instruments were administered as pretests and post-tests. A mixed analysis of variance with hierarchical design using a three-factor approach was conducted. The P. A. I. failed to register significant change in level of depression. The Personal Assessment Questionnaire registered change at the .0088 probability level, indicating the overall significance of the group treatment approach. The second independent variable, the subgroups generated at different locations, was found to be of insignificant effect upon the treatment variable. Informal comments by group members and observers suggest that this program of treatment for widows was of value to participants and could be helpful in other groups within church or similar settings. The program developed by Ray, a United Methodist minister, is being employed in churches of the Pacific and Southwest Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWidows -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectBereavement -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristiansen, Harley D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8315301en_US
dc.identifier.oclc688627168en_US
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