Economic convergence and urban growth: Structural changes in the Arizona urban system.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186196
Title:
Economic convergence and urban growth: Structural changes in the Arizona urban system.
Author:
Kim, Hak-Hoon.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Despite their fluctuating characteristics, urban economies of the U.S. during the last three decades exhibited relative steadiness in terms of the changing direction of general urban structure. Such changing characteristics of the urban system are expressed as structural convergence because economies of urban places have become more and more alike. This study explores the structural changes and growth factors of the Arizona urban system, using various analytic methods with the U.S. census data for 1970, 1980, and 1990. The results from the factor analyses of Arizona towns indicate that while the Arizona urban system has grown fast through inmigration and urbanization processes since the 1960s, its basic structural properties have been quite stable. It is also found that specific factors affecting urban growth have changed over time, though the general structure of the urban system has been stable. The results from the analyses of urban industrial structure indicate that the economies of Arizona towns have become more diversified and the level of industrial specialization has become increasingly associated with the size of urban population and employment over time. From the analyses of nonemployment income sources, it is found that nonemployment income has become more important in the economic bases of towns over time, and the elderly population and metropolitan proximity are associated with the increase of nonemployment income of the communities. Further, it is revealed that nonemployment income significantly increases nonbasic income. Specifically, nonbasic income of larger town is more affected by investment income and that of smaller town is more affected by transfer income. Along with the industrial diversification trend, the fact that nonemployment income has become increasingly important in urban economies confirms that urban economies are becoming more and more alike.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Geography.; Regional planning.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Geography and Regional Development; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Mulligan, Gordon F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEconomic convergence and urban growth: Structural changes in the Arizona urban system.en_US
dc.creatorKim, Hak-Hoon.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hak-Hoon.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDespite their fluctuating characteristics, urban economies of the U.S. during the last three decades exhibited relative steadiness in terms of the changing direction of general urban structure. Such changing characteristics of the urban system are expressed as structural convergence because economies of urban places have become more and more alike. This study explores the structural changes and growth factors of the Arizona urban system, using various analytic methods with the U.S. census data for 1970, 1980, and 1990. The results from the factor analyses of Arizona towns indicate that while the Arizona urban system has grown fast through inmigration and urbanization processes since the 1960s, its basic structural properties have been quite stable. It is also found that specific factors affecting urban growth have changed over time, though the general structure of the urban system has been stable. The results from the analyses of urban industrial structure indicate that the economies of Arizona towns have become more diversified and the level of industrial specialization has become increasingly associated with the size of urban population and employment over time. From the analyses of nonemployment income sources, it is found that nonemployment income has become more important in the economic bases of towns over time, and the elderly population and metropolitan proximity are associated with the increase of nonemployment income of the communities. Further, it is revealed that nonemployment income significantly increases nonbasic income. Specifically, nonbasic income of larger town is more affected by investment income and that of smaller town is more affected by transfer income. Along with the industrial diversification trend, the fact that nonemployment income has become increasingly important in urban economies confirms that urban economies are becoming more and more alike.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
dc.subjectRegional planning.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairMulligan, Gordon F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPlane, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGibson, Lay J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPavlakovich, Vera K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMann, Lawrence D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322696en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714896176en_US
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