An investigation into the relationship of instrumental density and dynamics of the Fourth Symphony by Charles Ives.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186184
Title:
An investigation into the relationship of instrumental density and dynamics of the Fourth Symphony by Charles Ives.
Author:
Glarner, Robert Lewis.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This research establishes an initial step in codifying a specific and formalized textural theory of music by developing a basic system for illuminating textural activity. The musical elements integral to this system include the rhythm, instrumental groups, and dynamics. In order to study the texture of Ives' Fourth Symphony, instruments are grouped together based upon similar rhythmic patterns. Individual instruments with no rhythmic relationship to any other instrumental part are labeled soloistic. Each group and solo part is considered either cooperative or antagonistic based upon rhythmic similarities/dissimilarities to other groups and solo parts. The changes in the number of groups, their instrumentation, and the solo instruments have a striking effect on the overall dynamic structure of the movement. Generally, the groups and soloistic instruments are more antagonistic in sections that are either building or have reached a dynamic climax. However, consistent principles of order for predicting such occurrences are not always present. A large amount of data is gathered in order to generate the graphic representations of each movement's texture. Graphs illustrate the number of instruments playing at any given time, how they are grouped, the number of soloistic instruments, their duration, and the perceived dynamics. The graphs aid in producing some overall observations and uncover additional details concerning the formal structure of this symphony resulting in a clearer understanding of Ives' methodology and organizational principles. For purposes of reference and discussion, the symphony is divided into sections according to the overall dynamic curve. Specifically, the points at which crescendos and diminuendos begin and end represent natural delineating areas.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Music.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Music; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Kolosick, J. Timothy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn investigation into the relationship of instrumental density and dynamics of the Fourth Symphony by Charles Ives.en_US
dc.creatorGlarner, Robert Lewis.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGlarner, Robert Lewis.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research establishes an initial step in codifying a specific and formalized textural theory of music by developing a basic system for illuminating textural activity. The musical elements integral to this system include the rhythm, instrumental groups, and dynamics. In order to study the texture of Ives' Fourth Symphony, instruments are grouped together based upon similar rhythmic patterns. Individual instruments with no rhythmic relationship to any other instrumental part are labeled soloistic. Each group and solo part is considered either cooperative or antagonistic based upon rhythmic similarities/dissimilarities to other groups and solo parts. The changes in the number of groups, their instrumentation, and the solo instruments have a striking effect on the overall dynamic structure of the movement. Generally, the groups and soloistic instruments are more antagonistic in sections that are either building or have reached a dynamic climax. However, consistent principles of order for predicting such occurrences are not always present. A large amount of data is gathered in order to generate the graphic representations of each movement's texture. Graphs illustrate the number of instruments playing at any given time, how they are grouped, the number of soloistic instruments, their duration, and the perceived dynamics. The graphs aid in producing some overall observations and uncover additional details concerning the formal structure of this symphony resulting in a clearer understanding of Ives' methodology and organizational principles. For purposes of reference and discussion, the symphony is divided into sections according to the overall dynamic curve. Specifically, the points at which crescendos and diminuendos begin and end represent natural delineating areas.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMusic.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusicen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKolosick, J. Timothyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322685en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702467505en_US
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