The structure, function, and metamorphic reorganization of the abdominal stretch receptor organ in Manduca sexta.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186168
Title:
The structure, function, and metamorphic reorganization of the abdominal stretch receptor organ in Manduca sexta.
Author:
Tamarkin, Dawn Alene
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines whether proprioceptive feedback to the nervous system changes as an animal's morphology and behavior are modified postembryonically. The stretch receptor organ (SRO) in the abdominal segments of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, was investigated using a variety of neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques. The first goal was to describe the cellular composition of the SRO. A thorough description of SRO anatomy is essential to understand its role in the behavior of this insect. This description included the characterization of the central arborization pattern of the SRO sensory neuron (SRSN) and the identification of the SRO motoneuron. The results revealed that the SRO shares anatomical features with other muscle-associated proprioceptive organs while having a much simpler composition. The second goal was to determine whether the SRO undergoes postembryonic modifications during metamorphosis. These results revealed that the SRO is relatively stable throughout metamorphosis, suggesting that any postembryonic changes in proprioceptive input are not due to alterations in SRO morphology and enabling an investigation of the role of the SRO in behavior at any stage of the insect's life. The last goal was to determine the synaptic input from the SRO to motoneurons that innervate power muscles in the abdomen, and to evaluate whether postembryonic development modifies the proprioceptive circuitry. The results of these studies revealed that the SRO provides synaptic input to abdominal motoneurons and that SRO synaptic input to these motoneurons is reorganized as this insect undergoes dramatic changes in behavior. The SRO is therefore an excellent model for investigations of muscle-associated proprioceptive organs. Several experiments are proposed at the conclusion of this dissertation. These would extend the present study and emphasize the value of the SRO as a model for understanding proprioceptive function.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Neurosciences.; Physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Neuroscience; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Levine, Richard B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe structure, function, and metamorphic reorganization of the abdominal stretch receptor organ in Manduca sexta.en_US
dc.creatorTamarkin, Dawn Aleneen_US
dc.contributor.authorTamarkin, Dawn Aleneen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines whether proprioceptive feedback to the nervous system changes as an animal's morphology and behavior are modified postembryonically. The stretch receptor organ (SRO) in the abdominal segments of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, was investigated using a variety of neuroanatomical and electrophysiological techniques. The first goal was to describe the cellular composition of the SRO. A thorough description of SRO anatomy is essential to understand its role in the behavior of this insect. This description included the characterization of the central arborization pattern of the SRO sensory neuron (SRSN) and the identification of the SRO motoneuron. The results revealed that the SRO shares anatomical features with other muscle-associated proprioceptive organs while having a much simpler composition. The second goal was to determine whether the SRO undergoes postembryonic modifications during metamorphosis. These results revealed that the SRO is relatively stable throughout metamorphosis, suggesting that any postembryonic changes in proprioceptive input are not due to alterations in SRO morphology and enabling an investigation of the role of the SRO in behavior at any stage of the insect's life. The last goal was to determine the synaptic input from the SRO to motoneurons that innervate power muscles in the abdomen, and to evaluate whether postembryonic development modifies the proprioceptive circuitry. The results of these studies revealed that the SRO provides synaptic input to abdominal motoneurons and that SRO synaptic input to these motoneurons is reorganized as this insect undergoes dramatic changes in behavior. The SRO is therefore an excellent model for investigations of muscle-associated proprioceptive organs. Several experiments are proposed at the conclusion of this dissertation. These would extend the present study and emphasize the value of the SRO as a model for understanding proprioceptive function.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectNeurosciences.en_US
dc.subjectPhysiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLevine, Richard B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArbas, Edmund A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTolbert, Leslie P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStuart, Douglasen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEnoka, Rogeren_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322668en_US
dc.identifier.oclc715407899en_US
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