Human responses to past climate, environment, and population in two Mogollon areas of New Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186167
Title:
Human responses to past climate, environment, and population in two Mogollon areas of New Mexico.
Author:
Shaw, Chester Worth, Jr.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Climate-sensitive tree ring chronologies and modern climate data are used to produce prehistoric estimates of summer drought for the Mimbres and Pinelawn-Reserve areas in New Mexico. The nature of these estimates are evaluated using tenets of the Anasazi behavioral model. It is concluded that many of the behavioral processes associated with prehistoric populations on the southern Colorado Plateaus can be seen operating within the two Mogollon areas selected for study. As they have on the plateaus, processes in past human behavior can be linked to three factors: prehistoric efforts to intensify agricultural production, fluctuations in population group size, and increases (or decreases) in summer drought.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Climatic changes -- New Mexico.; Mogollon culture -- New Mexico.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Reid, J. Jefferson; Graybill, Donald A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHuman responses to past climate, environment, and population in two Mogollon areas of New Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorShaw, Chester Worth, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Chester Worth, Jr.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractClimate-sensitive tree ring chronologies and modern climate data are used to produce prehistoric estimates of summer drought for the Mimbres and Pinelawn-Reserve areas in New Mexico. The nature of these estimates are evaluated using tenets of the Anasazi behavioral model. It is concluded that many of the behavioral processes associated with prehistoric populations on the southern Colorado Plateaus can be seen operating within the two Mogollon areas selected for study. As they have on the plateaus, processes in past human behavior can be linked to three factors: prehistoric efforts to intensify agricultural production, fluctuations in population group size, and increases (or decreases) in summer drought.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectClimatic changes -- New Mexico.en_US
dc.subjectMogollon culture -- New Mexico.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.contributor.chairGraybill, Donald A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDean, Jeffrey S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322667en_US
dc.identifier.oclc702370899en_US
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