Comparison of the relationship of academic success to self-concept, social acceptance and perceived social acceptance for hearing, hard of hearing and deaf adolescents in a mainstream setting.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186158
Title:
Comparison of the relationship of academic success to self-concept, social acceptance and perceived social acceptance for hearing, hard of hearing and deaf adolescents in a mainstream setting.
Author:
Coyner, Lisa Sharon
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated three constructs hypothesized to contribute to deaf and hard of hearing students' success in mainstream settings: self-concept, social acceptance, and perceived social acceptance. Twenty-five hearing, five deaf, and five hard of hearing junior high school students participated in this study. Students completed three measures: Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale, Form A (Adapted), Peer Rating Scale, and Student Activity Questionnaire (Adapted). The results indicated that hard of hearing and deaf students' self-concepts and their perceptions of their social acceptance were not significantly different from their hearing peers' self-evaluations. Hard of hearing and deaf students' self-concepts were found to be inversely related to the peer acceptance rating they received from their hard of hearing and deaf peers. The best predictor of academic success for hard of hearing and deaf students was the peer acceptance rating they received from hearing students. Consequently, hard of hearing and deaf students' success in a mainstream program may be influenced by their social acceptance among hearing peers. Recommendations for increasing social acceptance in the mainstream setting were presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mainstreaming in education.; Inclusive education.; Hearing impaired -- Psychology.; Deaf -- Psychology.; Social acceptance.; Academic achievement.; Self-perception.; Adolescent psychology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Special Education and Rehabilitation; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Eldredge, Nancy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleComparison of the relationship of academic success to self-concept, social acceptance and perceived social acceptance for hearing, hard of hearing and deaf adolescents in a mainstream setting.en_US
dc.creatorCoyner, Lisa Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoyner, Lisa Sharonen_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated three constructs hypothesized to contribute to deaf and hard of hearing students' success in mainstream settings: self-concept, social acceptance, and perceived social acceptance. Twenty-five hearing, five deaf, and five hard of hearing junior high school students participated in this study. Students completed three measures: Piers-Harris Self-Concept Scale, Form A (Adapted), Peer Rating Scale, and Student Activity Questionnaire (Adapted). The results indicated that hard of hearing and deaf students' self-concepts and their perceptions of their social acceptance were not significantly different from their hearing peers' self-evaluations. Hard of hearing and deaf students' self-concepts were found to be inversely related to the peer acceptance rating they received from their hard of hearing and deaf peers. The best predictor of academic success for hard of hearing and deaf students was the peer acceptance rating they received from hearing students. Consequently, hard of hearing and deaf students' success in a mainstream program may be influenced by their social acceptance among hearing peers. Recommendations for increasing social acceptance in the mainstream setting were presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMainstreaming in education.en_US
dc.subjectInclusive education.en_US
dc.subjectHearing impaired -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectDeaf -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectSocial acceptance.en_US
dc.subjectAcademic achievement.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception.en_US
dc.subjectAdolescent psychology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Education and Rehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairEldredge, Nancyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, S. Maeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberOrganist, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAleamoni, Lawrence M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322659en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701556510en_US
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