Presidential succession and United States-Latin American relations.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186120
Title:
Presidential succession and United States-Latin American relations.
Author:
Gaarder, Stephen Matthew.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the consequences of presidential change for American foreign policy toward Latin America during the post World War II era. It focuses upon five dimensions of inter-American relations and analyzes the effects of presidential succession upon these foreign policy behaviors: Economic and military aid, bilateral international agreements, symbolic attention toward Latin America, and political use of force in Latin America. Using time-series analysis, this research tests the hypothesis that foreign policy should be largely immune from the effects of changing presidencies. The empirical findings lend qualified support to this expectation. The political use of force appears largely immune from the influence of presidential succession. The allocation of economic aid as well as the creation of international agreements and symbolic attention all appear minimally susceptible to presidential change. Military aid, on the other hand, is noticeably sensitive to fluctuations in leadership.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; International relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Political Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Dixon, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePresidential succession and United States-Latin American relations.en_US
dc.creatorGaarder, Stephen Matthew.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGaarder, Stephen Matthew.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the consequences of presidential change for American foreign policy toward Latin America during the post World War II era. It focuses upon five dimensions of inter-American relations and analyzes the effects of presidential succession upon these foreign policy behaviors: Economic and military aid, bilateral international agreements, symbolic attention toward Latin America, and political use of force in Latin America. Using time-series analysis, this research tests the hypothesis that foreign policy should be largely immune from the effects of changing presidencies. The empirical findings lend qualified support to this expectation. The political use of force appears largely immune from the influence of presidential succession. The allocation of economic aid as well as the creation of international agreements and symbolic attention all appear minimally susceptible to presidential change. Military aid, on the other hand, is noticeably sensitive to fluctuations in leadership.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectInternational relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDixon, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSullivan, Michael P.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, Edward J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9322623en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714879822en_US
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