Distributive justice vs. procedural justice: Perceptions of fairness of Saudi Arabian civil service employees in their performance appraisal system.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186110
Title:
Distributive justice vs. procedural justice: Perceptions of fairness of Saudi Arabian civil service employees in their performance appraisal system.
Author:
Ghulam, Shakil Ahmed Ghulam Gadir.
Issue Date:
1993
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study uses the concepts of distributive justice and procedural justice to examine Saudi Arabian civil service employees' determinants of fairness in their performance appraisal system. A survey of 400 civil service employees in different public sector agencies in two major cities of Saudi Arabia, Riyadh and Jeddah, was conducted. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested. The composite dependent variable was the "Perceived satisfaction and fairness of the performance appraisal system." Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Multiple regressions and T-tests analyses were used to analyze the gathered data. The study found that perceptions of fairness among Saudi civil service employees an their performance appraisal system were strongly related to four procedural justice factors: (1) feedback received from the performance evaluation process helped to identify strengths and weaknesses of employees' performance, (2) the extent to which performance appraisal was used for setting goals for future performance, (3) participation in goal setting, and (4) whether the performance appraisal was used for determining training needs. These findings provide strong support for procedural justice theories. Moreover, this study found that cultural values may not be a significant factor in explaining Saudi civil service employees' reaction to their performance appraisal system. Finally, findings of this study have important implications for multinational companies and their consultants.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Business administration, Management.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Business Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Beach, Lee Roy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDistributive justice vs. procedural justice: Perceptions of fairness of Saudi Arabian civil service employees in their performance appraisal system.en_US
dc.creatorGhulam, Shakil Ahmed Ghulam Gadir.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGhulam, Shakil Ahmed Ghulam Gadir.en_US
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study uses the concepts of distributive justice and procedural justice to examine Saudi Arabian civil service employees' determinants of fairness in their performance appraisal system. A survey of 400 civil service employees in different public sector agencies in two major cities of Saudi Arabia, Riyadh and Jeddah, was conducted. Seven hypotheses were proposed and tested. The composite dependent variable was the "Perceived satisfaction and fairness of the performance appraisal system." Data were collected by means of a questionnaire. Multiple regressions and T-tests analyses were used to analyze the gathered data. The study found that perceptions of fairness among Saudi civil service employees an their performance appraisal system were strongly related to four procedural justice factors: (1) feedback received from the performance evaluation process helped to identify strengths and weaknesses of employees' performance, (2) the extent to which performance appraisal was used for setting goals for future performance, (3) participation in goal setting, and (4) whether the performance appraisal was used for determining training needs. These findings provide strong support for procedural justice theories. Moreover, this study found that cultural values may not be a significant factor in explaining Saudi civil service employees' reaction to their performance appraisal system. Finally, findings of this study have important implications for multinational companies and their consultants.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBusiness administration, Management.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBeach, Lee Royen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTansik, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTindall, Robert E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9313010en_US
dc.identifier.oclc703155436en_US
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