The relationship among leadership, empowerment, and academic achievement for black students: A case study of the South Mountain High School JROTC program.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186096
Title:
The relationship among leadership, empowerment, and academic achievement for black students: A case study of the South Mountain High School JROTC program.
Author:
Boykins, Ronald.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated a Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) program in one high school in Arizona to discover relationships among empowerment, leadership, and achievement in schools that have JROTC programs. Anecdotes and experiences of those participating in JROTC suggested that this program and the concepts that guide it would provide techniques for solving the underachievement of black students in schools today. Specifically, this study analyzed the current conditions of black students in a JROTC program in one high school by fully examining and describing aspects of this program. In addition, the study examined the contributions of the program to promoting empowerment, leadership, and academic achievement among black students. Data collection methods were designed to explore and describe the JROTC phenomenon at one high school. Three lists of questions were developed to gather data from students, teachers, and the JROTC faculty. The purpose of this study was to lend support to what may be occurring in JROTC to influence the academic achievement of JROTC students. Each group of respondents provided information that helped the researcher to get a better understanding of what was occurring in the program and how this process may influence achievement. In this study, 14 black students, three JROTC instructors, and five teachers were questioned about the programs and its impact on the public school experiences of the black students enrolled in the program. Pre- and post-grade point averages for these students were also examined to explore relationships among achievement, leadership, and empowerment. Data for this study were of such a nature that analysis by statistical methods only would not make the fullest use of all information available. For this reason, a case study of the South Mountain JROTC Program, with an emphasis on the black student enrolled, was presented. Statistical comparisons of the pre- and post-grade point averages were also made. This study suggested that the JROTC program may have implications for positively influencing the achievement of black students. Additionally, self-esteem building, peer influence, and self-discipline may have possibilities for implementation in many schools.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; African Americans -- Study and teaching.
Degree Name:
Ed.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Heckman, Paul E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe relationship among leadership, empowerment, and academic achievement for black students: A case study of the South Mountain High School JROTC program.en_US
dc.creatorBoykins, Ronald.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBoykins, Ronald.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated a Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) program in one high school in Arizona to discover relationships among empowerment, leadership, and achievement in schools that have JROTC programs. Anecdotes and experiences of those participating in JROTC suggested that this program and the concepts that guide it would provide techniques for solving the underachievement of black students in schools today. Specifically, this study analyzed the current conditions of black students in a JROTC program in one high school by fully examining and describing aspects of this program. In addition, the study examined the contributions of the program to promoting empowerment, leadership, and academic achievement among black students. Data collection methods were designed to explore and describe the JROTC phenomenon at one high school. Three lists of questions were developed to gather data from students, teachers, and the JROTC faculty. The purpose of this study was to lend support to what may be occurring in JROTC to influence the academic achievement of JROTC students. Each group of respondents provided information that helped the researcher to get a better understanding of what was occurring in the program and how this process may influence achievement. In this study, 14 black students, three JROTC instructors, and five teachers were questioned about the programs and its impact on the public school experiences of the black students enrolled in the program. Pre- and post-grade point averages for these students were also examined to explore relationships among achievement, leadership, and empowerment. Data for this study were of such a nature that analysis by statistical methods only would not make the fullest use of all information available. For this reason, a case study of the South Mountain JROTC Program, with an emphasis on the black student enrolled, was presented. Statistical comparisons of the pre- and post-grade point averages were also made. This study suggested that the JROTC program may have implications for positively influencing the achievement of black students. Additionally, self-esteem building, peer influence, and self-discipline may have possibilities for implementation in many schools.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectAfrican Americans -- Study and teaching.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, L. O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaunders, T. Franken_US
dc.identifier.proquest9310604en_US
dc.identifier.oclc713372019en_US
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