Black high school dropouts: Categorization and variables in education that affect minority students.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186088
Title:
Black high school dropouts: Categorization and variables in education that affect minority students.
Author:
Tavares, Mahalia.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research into current literature regarding black dropouts and black at-risk students indicated that there were many reasons cited by writers as to why these students have failed or succeeded in academic settings. However, writers cited two major reasons for the lack of academic success at the high school level. These reasons were socioeconomic status and race, with demographics listed as a close third. The need existed for analytical identification of the variables which affected these minority students and the specific strategies required to assure their educational success. The purpose of this study was to identify the variables that are characteristic of black high school dropouts and compile a list of variables which would sort into a taxonomy made up of several categories. A Parallel Pairs Model was developed to sort and classify the multiplicity of variables found in some of the educational programs and situations that were researched. The model established three categories into which the reasons that black students dropout, could be sorted. The differentiations depicted by the categories of the model help to identify systems and approaches to improve the education of these students. An auxiliary objective of this study was to draft a program evaluation strategy that could be implemented once unique variables wore no longer ambiguous. Essential recommendations suggested by this study are threefold. The relationship between the dropout rate and the economic system becomes essential in policy making about education, e.g., funding should be equitably allocated. Redesigning academic strategies to accommodate all students becomes the primary focus of all school districts, e.g., adjust schools to the learners. The application of a taxonomy, as developed in this study, is advantageous as a checklist or diagnostic tool. Usage suggests valuative and preventive techniques.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
High school dropouts -- Arizona.; Academic achievement -- Arizona.; African American students.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Saunders, T. Frank

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBlack high school dropouts: Categorization and variables in education that affect minority students.en_US
dc.creatorTavares, Mahalia.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTavares, Mahalia.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch into current literature regarding black dropouts and black at-risk students indicated that there were many reasons cited by writers as to why these students have failed or succeeded in academic settings. However, writers cited two major reasons for the lack of academic success at the high school level. These reasons were socioeconomic status and race, with demographics listed as a close third. The need existed for analytical identification of the variables which affected these minority students and the specific strategies required to assure their educational success. The purpose of this study was to identify the variables that are characteristic of black high school dropouts and compile a list of variables which would sort into a taxonomy made up of several categories. A Parallel Pairs Model was developed to sort and classify the multiplicity of variables found in some of the educational programs and situations that were researched. The model established three categories into which the reasons that black students dropout, could be sorted. The differentiations depicted by the categories of the model help to identify systems and approaches to improve the education of these students. An auxiliary objective of this study was to draft a program evaluation strategy that could be implemented once unique variables wore no longer ambiguous. Essential recommendations suggested by this study are threefold. The relationship between the dropout rate and the economic system becomes essential in policy making about education, e.g., funding should be equitably allocated. Redesigning academic strategies to accommodate all students becomes the primary focus of all school districts, e.g., adjust schools to the learners. The application of a taxonomy, as developed in this study, is advantageous as a checklist or diagnostic tool. Usage suggests valuative and preventive techniques.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHigh school dropouts -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAcademic achievement -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectAfrican American students.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSaunders, T. Franken_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Lawrence O.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHeckman, Paul E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberConley, Sharon C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFuentevilla, Arminda R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9310597en_US
dc.identifier.oclc700942932en_US
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