Alluvial cycles and early agricultural settlement phases in the Jordan Valley

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186086
Title:
Alluvial cycles and early agricultural settlement phases in the Jordan Valley
Author:
Mabry, Jonathan Blum
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The parallel development of archaeology and Quaternary geology in several regions of the world is reviewed, and common problems in dating and correlating alluvial sequences are discussed. Buried archaeological remains and radiometric dates provide a chronological framework for the sequence of Late Quaternary alluvial deposits in the central Jordan Rift. While previous studies emphasized a simple, two-stage model of Late Quaternary alluvial deposition, regional comparisons of the geomorphological contexts of archaeological sites of different ages indicate complex, multiple depositional and erosional cycles. These cycles were influenced by tectonism, climatic changes, human land use, and natural geomorphic thresholds, sometimes in combination. The stratigraphy and chronology of early agricultural settlements in the valley are summarized, and investigations at a protohistoric agricultural town are described. Major regional shifts in prehistoric and protohistoric patterns of agriculture and settlement are interpreted in terms of the impacts of changes in alluvial regimes. These correlations have implications for models of agricultural origins, and the stability and resilience of sedentary settlements in dry lands.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Land settlement patterns, Prehistoric -- Jordan River Valley.; Antiquities, Prehistoric -- Jordan River Valley.; Geology, Stratigraphic -- Quaternary.; Alluvial plains -- Jordan River Valley.; Archaeological dating -- Jordan River Valley.; Excavations (Archaeology) -- Jordan River Valley.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Anthropology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Olsen, John W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAlluvial cycles and early agricultural settlement phases in the Jordan Valleyen_US
dc.creatorMabry, Jonathan Blumen_US
dc.contributor.authorMabry, Jonathan Blumen_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe parallel development of archaeology and Quaternary geology in several regions of the world is reviewed, and common problems in dating and correlating alluvial sequences are discussed. Buried archaeological remains and radiometric dates provide a chronological framework for the sequence of Late Quaternary alluvial deposits in the central Jordan Rift. While previous studies emphasized a simple, two-stage model of Late Quaternary alluvial deposition, regional comparisons of the geomorphological contexts of archaeological sites of different ages indicate complex, multiple depositional and erosional cycles. These cycles were influenced by tectonism, climatic changes, human land use, and natural geomorphic thresholds, sometimes in combination. The stratigraphy and chronology of early agricultural settlements in the valley are summarized, and investigations at a protohistoric agricultural town are described. Major regional shifts in prehistoric and protohistoric patterns of agriculture and settlement are interpreted in terms of the impacts of changes in alluvial regimes. These correlations have implications for models of agricultural origins, and the stability and resilience of sedentary settlements in dry lands.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLand settlement patterns, Prehistoric -- Jordan River Valley.en_US
dc.subjectAntiquities, Prehistoric -- Jordan River Valley.en_US
dc.subjectGeology, Stratigraphic -- Quaternary.en_US
dc.subjectAlluvial plains -- Jordan River Valley.en_US
dc.subjectArchaeological dating -- Jordan River Valley.en_US
dc.subjectExcavations (Archaeology) -- Jordan River Valley.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairOlsen, John W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHaynes, C. Vance, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDever, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9310595en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701731001en_US
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