The role of cognition, affect, and behavior in marital adjustment: A marital intervention outcome study of two versions of the mutual problem solving program.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186075
Title:
The role of cognition, affect, and behavior in marital adjustment: A marital intervention outcome study of two versions of the mutual problem solving program.
Author:
Muszynski, Richard Joseph.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Based upon the thesis that human functioning consists of affective, cognitive, and behavioral processes which operate interdependently, targeting all three areas should be more effective than targeting only one or two areas of functioning. The present study compared the Mutual Problem Solving Program, a marital therapy intervention with affective and behavioral components (MPS-AB), an MPS program with added cognitive components (MPS-CAB), and a wait-list control (WLC) condition. Forty-nine couples participated. Both treatments involved eight sessions. Assessment utilizing self-report questionnaires and observational measures was done at pre-test, post-test, and three-month follow-up. MPS-AB and MPS-CAB couples exhibited better dyadic adjustment (p =.006) than the WLC couples. MPS-AB was just as effective as MPS-CAB at improving irrational beliefs. The percentage of subjects who experienced statistically reliable improvement in dyadic adjustment from pre-test to post-test was 34.4, 35.3, and 9.4, for the MPS-AB, MPS-CAB, and WLC groups respectively, while for deterioration the percentages were 18.8, 11.8, and 37.5. Emotion was the best predictor of dyadic adjustment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic.; Social case work.; Mental health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Ridley, Carl

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleThe role of cognition, affect, and behavior in marital adjustment: A marital intervention outcome study of two versions of the mutual problem solving program.en_US
dc.creatorMuszynski, Richard Joseph.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMuszynski, Richard Joseph.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBased upon the thesis that human functioning consists of affective, cognitive, and behavioral processes which operate interdependently, targeting all three areas should be more effective than targeting only one or two areas of functioning. The present study compared the Mutual Problem Solving Program, a marital therapy intervention with affective and behavioral components (MPS-AB), an MPS program with added cognitive components (MPS-CAB), and a wait-list control (WLC) condition. Forty-nine couples participated. Both treatments involved eight sessions. Assessment utilizing self-report questionnaires and observational measures was done at pre-test, post-test, and three-month follow-up. MPS-AB and MPS-CAB couples exhibited better dyadic adjustment (p =.006) than the WLC couples. MPS-AB was just as effective as MPS-CAB at improving irrational beliefs. The percentage of subjects who experienced statistically reliable improvement in dyadic adjustment from pre-test to post-test was 34.4, 35.3, and 9.4, for the MPS-AB, MPS-CAB, and WLC groups respectively, while for deterioration the percentages were 18.8, 11.8, and 37.5. Emotion was the best predictor of dyadic adjustment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academic.en_US
dc.subjectSocial case work.en_US
dc.subjectMental health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRidley, Carlen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSalomon, Vardaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKahn, Marvinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRosser, Rosemaryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9309035en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714161907en_US
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