Effects of postural stability and age on behavioral laterality in squirrel monkeys.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186072
Title:
Effects of postural stability and age on behavioral laterality in squirrel monkeys.
Author:
Michels, Raenel Ruth.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Six young and six aged Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) made unimanual food reaches from a posturally stable, solid base platform, a posturally unstable fenced ceiling and an extremely posturally unstable chain link tightrope. Although population level right hand biases were present in the solid base and tightrope testing conditions, the monkeys were best described as consisting of two subpopulations; 9 strongly, consistently dextral subjects and 3 strongly, consistently sinistral subjects. The strength of lateral hand preferences, which were weakly expressed in the solid base condition, intensified during the posturally unstable ceiling and tightrope testing conditions. Right or left turning after a manual response was not affected by handedness of the monkeys or directly affected by manual task type. However, young monkeys turn and hand bias directions increased in congruence as manual task stability decreased. Aged subjects showed weak turn and hand bias direction congruence in the posturally stable task and this congruence decreased in the posturally unstable conditions. All monkeys expressed a right turn preference during free movement and this preference was positively correlated to strength of hand biases. Each subject also expressed a left hindlimb preference for mounting and dismounting a chain link fence. However, strongly right handed monkeys showed weakest left hindlimb biases and strongly left handed monkeys showed strongest left hindlimb biases.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Dissertations, Academic; Animal behavior.; Physiology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
King, James E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEffects of postural stability and age on behavioral laterality in squirrel monkeys.en_US
dc.creatorMichels, Raenel Ruth.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMichels, Raenel Ruth.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSix young and six aged Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) made unimanual food reaches from a posturally stable, solid base platform, a posturally unstable fenced ceiling and an extremely posturally unstable chain link tightrope. Although population level right hand biases were present in the solid base and tightrope testing conditions, the monkeys were best described as consisting of two subpopulations; 9 strongly, consistently dextral subjects and 3 strongly, consistently sinistral subjects. The strength of lateral hand preferences, which were weakly expressed in the solid base condition, intensified during the posturally unstable ceiling and tightrope testing conditions. Right or left turning after a manual response was not affected by handedness of the monkeys or directly affected by manual task type. However, young monkeys turn and hand bias directions increased in congruence as manual task stability decreased. Aged subjects showed weak turn and hand bias direction congruence in the posturally stable task and this congruence decreased in the posturally unstable conditions. All monkeys expressed a right turn preference during free movement and this preference was positively correlated to strength of hand biases. Each subject also expressed a left hindlimb preference for mounting and dismounting a chain link fence. However, strongly right handed monkeys showed weakest left hindlimb biases and strongly left handed monkeys showed strongest left hindlimb biases.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectAnimal behavior.en_US
dc.subjectPhysiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKing, James E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPool, Ronald H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLansing, Robert W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFigueredo, Aurelio J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9309032en_US
dc.identifier.oclc714160997en_US
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