Factors influencing germination and establishment of Arizona cottontop, bush muhly, and plains lovegrass in southern Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186068
Title:
Factors influencing germination and establishment of Arizona cottontop, bush muhly, and plains lovegrass in southern Arizona.
Author:
Livingston, Margaret.
Issue Date:
1992
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Germination and establishment was evaluated in Arizona cottontop (Digitaria californica (Benth.) Chase), bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri Scribn.) and plains lovegrass (Eragrostis intermedia Hitchc.) from southern Arizona. Germination was determined in different aged seed harvested from native and irrigated plots of various populations. Results indicated variability in germination characteristics of study species that appeared unrelated to afterripening or dormancy. Germination ranged from 62 to 96% for Arizona cottontop, 34 to 99% for plains lovegrass, and 75 to 99% for bush muhly. Bush muhly had highest average velocity of germination (58.0 ± 4.1), followed by plains lovegrass (35.9 ± 1.91), and Arizona cottontop (31.4 ± 1.13). Effects of 3 surface treatments (furrows, gravel, litter) and 2 cultivation treatments on establishment of study species and yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng var. ischaemum) was investigated in the field. Bush muhly did not emerge and plains lovegrass had minimal emergence. Arizona cottontop had similar emergence in cultivated and uncultivated plots whereas yellow bluestem had greater emergence in cultivated plots. Litter promoted greater survival of Arizona cottontop. Lower survival in furrows may have resulted from fewer days with available soil moisture and interference from greater density of non-seeded species. Soil covers appear to positively influence survival rather than emergence. Effect of rainfall distribution on germination was investigated using 2 seed retrieval methods. Arizona cottontop and bush muhly germinated after at least 3 days of available soil moisture. Plains lovegrass seeds did not germinate in the field but retrieved seeds had 83% germination, possibly due to light exposure under laboratory conditions. Another study determined whether species have different density and cover under overstory species compared to open areas. Arizona cottontop had either greater, less, or no differences in density under canopied versus open areas. Cover of Arizona cottontop was greater or similar among canopied and open areas. Plains lovegrass had lower or similar density and cover under canopies than in open areas. Bush muhly had greater density and cover under canopies. Overall, studies suggested that species are easily germinated, but accept relatively narrow ranges of environmental conditions for establishment. Establishment may be enhanced by sowing species when rainfall is consistent, extending available moisture through use of soil covers, or mimicking microsites where a species occurs naturally.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Grasses -- Seeds -- Viability -- Arizona.; Grasses -- Arizona -- Growth.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Roundy, Bruce

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFactors influencing germination and establishment of Arizona cottontop, bush muhly, and plains lovegrass in southern Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorLivingston, Margaret.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Margaret.en_US
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGermination and establishment was evaluated in Arizona cottontop (Digitaria californica (Benth.) Chase), bush muhly (Muhlenbergia porteri Scribn.) and plains lovegrass (Eragrostis intermedia Hitchc.) from southern Arizona. Germination was determined in different aged seed harvested from native and irrigated plots of various populations. Results indicated variability in germination characteristics of study species that appeared unrelated to afterripening or dormancy. Germination ranged from 62 to 96% for Arizona cottontop, 34 to 99% for plains lovegrass, and 75 to 99% for bush muhly. Bush muhly had highest average velocity of germination (58.0 ± 4.1), followed by plains lovegrass (35.9 ± 1.91), and Arizona cottontop (31.4 ± 1.13). Effects of 3 surface treatments (furrows, gravel, litter) and 2 cultivation treatments on establishment of study species and yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum (L.) Keng var. ischaemum) was investigated in the field. Bush muhly did not emerge and plains lovegrass had minimal emergence. Arizona cottontop had similar emergence in cultivated and uncultivated plots whereas yellow bluestem had greater emergence in cultivated plots. Litter promoted greater survival of Arizona cottontop. Lower survival in furrows may have resulted from fewer days with available soil moisture and interference from greater density of non-seeded species. Soil covers appear to positively influence survival rather than emergence. Effect of rainfall distribution on germination was investigated using 2 seed retrieval methods. Arizona cottontop and bush muhly germinated after at least 3 days of available soil moisture. Plains lovegrass seeds did not germinate in the field but retrieved seeds had 83% germination, possibly due to light exposure under laboratory conditions. Another study determined whether species have different density and cover under overstory species compared to open areas. Arizona cottontop had either greater, less, or no differences in density under canopied versus open areas. Cover of Arizona cottontop was greater or similar among canopied and open areas. Plains lovegrass had lower or similar density and cover under canopies than in open areas. Bush muhly had greater density and cover under canopies. Overall, studies suggested that species are easily germinated, but accept relatively narrow ranges of environmental conditions for establishment. Establishment may be enhanced by sowing species when rainfall is consistent, extending available moisture through use of soil covers, or mimicking microsites where a species occurs naturally.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGrasses -- Seeds -- Viability -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectGrasses -- Arizona -- Growth.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRoundy, Bruceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGraham, Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcPherson, Guyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStrauss, Richarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilkin, Donen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9309029en_US
dc.identifier.oclc701553211en_US
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