Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/186060
Title:
CAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE WOMEN ADMINISTRATORS.
Author:
HOLZMILLER, PAMELA ANNE.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this research has been to investigate the current situation of selected women in administrative positions in community colleges. This study proposed: (1) to develop a profile of selected women in community college administration positions in the United States community colleges to identify the kind of women who aspire to and succeed in community college administration; (2) to determine areas in which these selected women feel they need more training in order to advance or maintain a position in community college administration; (3) to examine the problems and rewards that these selected women find in their careers in community college administration; and (4) to determine how these selected women feel about themselves as women and administrators. The population for this study were women chosen for the Leaders for the 80's Professional Development Project sponsored by the American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges and the League for Innovation in the Community College. From this group of 309 women, 228 responded to the Women in Community College Administrative Positions Questionnaire. The data were aggregated from the usable questionnaires and analyzed by frequency distribution with percents to report findings. The study showed this national sample of women either in educational administration or slated for administration represented a new generation of female educational administrators. Many have been hired since the advent of affirmative action policies and antidiscrimination laws went into effect. These women, women in most professions, have made progress in the last decade. Unquestionably, there are many reasons for this progress, including the existence of affirmative action legislation, the resurgence of the women's movement, and growing awareness levels on the part of women, both collectively and individually, of their own potential, capabilities and aspirations. If the progress for women in educational administration is to continue, they must look first to themselves, through their influence, determination, and competency. This study has shown that these selected women are very traditional and conventional in both their personal and professional lives.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women college administrators -- United States.; Women executives -- United States.; Community colleges -- United States.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sacken, Donald Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCAREER DEVELOPMENT FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGE WOMEN ADMINISTRATORS.en_US
dc.creatorHOLZMILLER, PAMELA ANNE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHOLZMILLER, PAMELA ANNE.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this research has been to investigate the current situation of selected women in administrative positions in community colleges. This study proposed: (1) to develop a profile of selected women in community college administration positions in the United States community colleges to identify the kind of women who aspire to and succeed in community college administration; (2) to determine areas in which these selected women feel they need more training in order to advance or maintain a position in community college administration; (3) to examine the problems and rewards that these selected women find in their careers in community college administration; and (4) to determine how these selected women feel about themselves as women and administrators. The population for this study were women chosen for the Leaders for the 80's Professional Development Project sponsored by the American Association of Women in Community and Junior Colleges and the League for Innovation in the Community College. From this group of 309 women, 228 responded to the Women in Community College Administrative Positions Questionnaire. The data were aggregated from the usable questionnaires and analyzed by frequency distribution with percents to report findings. The study showed this national sample of women either in educational administration or slated for administration represented a new generation of female educational administrators. Many have been hired since the advent of affirmative action policies and antidiscrimination laws went into effect. These women, women in most professions, have made progress in the last decade. Unquestionably, there are many reasons for this progress, including the existence of affirmative action legislation, the resurgence of the women's movement, and growing awareness levels on the part of women, both collectively and individually, of their own potential, capabilities and aspirations. If the progress for women in educational administration is to continue, they must look first to themselves, through their influence, determination, and competency. This study has shown that these selected women are very traditional and conventional in both their personal and professional lives.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen college administrators -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectWomen executives -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectCommunity colleges -- United States.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSacken, Donald Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Robert T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberClark, Donald C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8315286en_US
dc.identifier.oclc688623483en_US
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